Nude review by Camel

logo Ultimate Guitar
  • Released: Jan 1, 1981
  • Sound: 8
  • Lyrics: 8
  • Overall Impression: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 8 Superb
  • Users' score: 5.8 (5 votes)
Camel: Nude
2

Sound — 8
You know, the overall idea of progressive music produced in the 1980s has always left that taste of vomit in my mouth. Most hardcore prog fans, such as myself, tend to disown the decade and pretend that it did not exist. With that said, I am delighted to say that there is at least one album, from the 80s, that may very well be one of the most prominent and beautiful records ever to be released. I am talking about none other than Camel's 1981 effort, Nude. With it's almost classically percieved structure, Nude blows your mind every second. The musicianship on this album is stellar, utilizing symphonies, vibraphones, and, yes, even a saxophone. Take that, Pink Floyd. There is even a song (Homecoming) that resembles a marching band in a parade. It's that diverse. The time signature switches on this album are absolutely nuts, and to make it even sweeter to the first time listener, it's very limited with vocals, and that really makes the music incredibly enjoyable. Overall, the sound is rocking on all cylinders, and the switching of gears periodically on this album I think make it stand out.

Lyrics — 8
Not many lyrics. Lyrics I guess shouldn't be weighed that heavily when looking at a band like Camel, whose prowess lies in the compostion. However, Nude is a concept album in referrence to the true story of a Japanese WWII veteran who was stranded on an island and found years later, not knowing that the war had ended. This is quite evident in the song titles (City Life, Drafted, Beached, Docked, Homecoming, etc.). On the whole, I like the concept, so it gets a thumbs up from me.

Overall Impression — 8
Stellar. Magnificient. Until recently, I had never even heard of Camel. I always thought Camel was a pack of cheap cigarettes. Little did I know that this was a great band. A revolution in my life, if you will. This band introduced me to a decade of music that, quite frankly, I never wanted to even explore. I owe all of this, to this single album. If you listen to Nude thoroughly, it could very well have the same effect on you. Take a chance. You won't regret it.

8 comments sorted by best / new / date

    justinrobbins7
    The "impression" part of your review caught me off-guard with the Camel cigarettes thing, because that's what popped into my head immediately as well. Based on this, and the cool-sounding album concept, I'm making it a point to listen to the album.
    Yimes
    You make it sound like Camel had their peak in the eighties, when they made their absolute finest albums during the seventies. But, other than that, good review on a great album!
    Elrafa
    Nice review, if you are new to camel, check out "Mirage" and "the snow goose", they are true prog rock gems...
    cotton3434
    You know, the overall idea of progressive music produced in the 1980s has always left that taste of vomit in my mouth. Most hardcore prog fans, such as myself, tend to disown the decade and pretend that it did not exist.
    *points at Fates Warning and Queensryche*
    huevos
    cotton3434 wrote: You know, the overall idea of progressive music produced in the 1980s has always left that taste of vomit in my mouth. Most hardcore prog fans, such as myself, tend to disown the decade and pretend that it did not exist. *points at Fates Warning and Queensryche*
    You know it. Camels are not keep cigs. They cost as much as Malboros ($5-$6 a pack). I've never listened Camel, but I've heard of them. What should I expect?
    ed_the_head
    i like that progressive-concept approach to music too. think i'll give it a listen. but man, in the 80's there was Operation: Mindcrime by Queensryche. it's probably one of the best albums out there
    DownInAHole.
    When looking at prog bands that produced in the 60s/70s, most of their 80s offerings sucked. I dont place Queensryche in that same group as Camel, Floyd, Genesis, etc.