I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside Review

artist: Earl Sweatshirt date: 03/30/2015 category: compact discs
Earl Sweatshirt: I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside
Released: Mar 23, 2015
Genre: Underground Hip-Hop, Abstract Hip-Hop
Label: Tan Cressida, Columbia Records
Number Of Tracks: 10
Earl has established himself as a major player in the contemporary rap scene with this project. This is an album best enjoyed in a dark room with a lyrics sheet in front of you.
 Sound: 7
 Lyrics: 8
 Overall Impression: 7
 Overall rating:
 6.6 
 Reviewer rating:
 7.3 
 Users rating:
 5.8 
 Votes:
 12 
 Views:
 4,798 
review (1) pictures (1) 10 comments vote for this album:
overall: 7.3
I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside Reviewed by: Jordanschulte, on march 30, 2015
3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: A rap album review on Ultimate Guitar? I know.

"I Don't Like Sh-t, I Don't Go Outside" is 21 year old rapper Earl Sweatshirt's second full-length release. Earl, perhaps best known as a member of Los Angeles-based hip-hop collective Odd Future appears to be distancing himself from the group on his latest release. It includes very few features, none of which are from Odd Future members. The carnival-esque opener, "Huey," features an old-school drum beat paired with a catchy organ riff. Earl wastes no time, immediately launching into an easy-going verse that showcases both his rhythmic and lyrical skill. 

The production throughout the album is ominous, featuring unorthodox instrumentation and dreary melodies. The bass hits hard, but this album will likely be absent from frat parties or clubs. This is an album best enjoyed in a dark room with a lyrics sheet in front of you. "I Don't Like Sh-t, I Don't Go Outside" is by no means a party album. It doesn't feature any singles likely to become radio hits. Earl has crafted a collection of dark, contemplative songs with mesmerizing production. This production provides an excellent backdrop for his lyrical wizardry. // 7

Lyrics: It's lyrically where Earl truly excels. Earl is, as his album title suggests, something of a recluse. He mistrusts the outside world. He's conflicted in his relationships. On "Faucet" he describes a troubled relationship with his friends, his family, and himself. These snippets that provide a glance into his fears and emotions are distributed through the clever wordplay and outrageous bravado that fans have come to expect from Earl.

Despite his penchant for hyperbolic claims and violent lyrics, Earl presents a more believable character than many other contemporary rappers. He misses his mother, despite their troubled relationship. He doesn't know who to trust in light of his meteoric rise to fame. He's troubled by his drug use but doesn't seem to want to stop. He describes personal and relational struggles that allows the listener to empathize with him. He is, in a word, human. // 8

Overall Impression: If I had to offer one criticism of the album, it's that it drags by the end. This is especially surprising considering that the entire project is a paltry 30 minutes long. The beats, while entrancing and unique, tend to sound the same. I couldn't recall which song was which after my first listen because the production and lyrical content didn't tend to differ much from track to track.

Despite this, Earl has established himself as a major player in the contemporary rap scene with this project. No longer will he be defined by his membership in Odd Future. His lyrical skill and unique production allow him to stand on his own. Though it's unclear what his future with the collective will be, we now know he doesn't need them to create great music. As the sole writer credited on the album (besides a small handful of features), Earl may find long lasting success in the music industry despite the fact that he neither likes sh-t nor goes outside. // 7


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