Mechanize review by Fear Factory

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  • Released: Feb 9, 2010
  • Sound: 8
  • Lyrics: 9
  • Overall Impression: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 8.3 Superb
  • Users' score: 8.8 (63 votes)
Fear Factory: Mechanize
2

Sound — 8
Fear Factory has been a driving force in the Metal genre for quite some time now, not only making some killer albums, but also withstanding the test of time both musically and during inner turmoil. Onlookers have seen the petty cheap shots in different interviews between Dino Cazares, Christian Olde Wolbers and the rest, but the band itself has kept on cranking out new albums and touring despite it all. It all depends on the person with the headphones on, but I know I'm not alone in the feeling that Fear Factory was better with Dino on the guitars instead of Christian. Dino even accused Christian at one point of "copying his style", but was happy so long as he kept getting royalties off of the songs he wrote. Be that as it may, there is a definite difference between the Fear Factory of the past, and the Fear Factory of today. That is, up until this recent album. After the record label suppressed songs on Digimortal put Dino in an uncomfortable position musically, moving on to Divine Heresy and letting some anger and new guitar experiments out have helped him to round out his play style to sweeten his return to Fear Factory for a new album. This new album has been described as a missing ink between Demanufacture and Obsolete, and in many ways, that's absolutely true. But it's also clear that Dino took a piece of Divine Heresy with him when he returned to the studio with Fear Factory. Again, whether that's a good or a bad thing, depends on the listener. On the opening track, I was worried Dino had changed the direction of the band completely, until the chorus of 'Industrial Discipline' hit on track 2. All of my memories of speeding around in my car with the windows down, drums pounding and synth-laced chorus just came rushing back. My dearly missed Fear Factory has come back to me. And it feels great. The touches of Divine Heresy are heard in the aggression and speed of the drums and guitar, but luckily aren't overdone (usually) to the point where the album no longer retains the bands roots. The music sounds familiar but refreshing with Gene Hoglan on drums, and while I feel sad to see the original lineup split (again), they couldn't have picked a more suitable replacement. I find that sticking to your roots while trying to explore new avenues musically is a big problem with the bands of today, and Fear Factory managed to get the formula right with 'Mechanize'. Props, guys. Props.

Lyrics — 9
While a lot of the lyrics may seem not a whole lot different than their previous efforts when giving them a quick read, looking into the context and back story of the album and certain tracks reveal what this album is truly about. The majority of the songs here are heavily based around a book from author Alvin Toffler, describing his theory on the evolution of human kind from the "2nd wave" of human civilization the Industrial Age, to the "3rd wave" or Post-Industrial/ Information age. The basic principle of moving further and further away from the human element in day to day living. This rings very true if looked at from a philosophical perspective. Therefore, I find the meaning of this album extremely deep and inspired. Burton C Bell has done a damn fine job is keeping himself in good singing shape year after year. The UG featured review does mention the possibility of him being auto-tuned possibly, when it comes to the album. And while I'm sure there was a bit of that going on in the production booth, recent live performances suggest (again, as stated by the UG featured review) he can still keep pace with other youngster Metal vocalists. He performs very powerful yells, and fairly strong, albeit sometimes in and out of tune choruses. Considering I'd probably snap my vocal chords clean in half by trying to scream like he does, he's still in good standing with me. As far as the lyrics working with the music; This band has been around the block a few times. They know how it's done, and it shows.

Overall Impression — 8
As mentioned earlier, Dino definitely took a piece of Divine Heresy with him when he left that band to re-unite with Fear Factory. I don't necessarily see it as a bad thing, and open-minded newcomers who have never listened to Fear Factory before probably won't have a problem with it. Certain hardcore fans of Fear Factory who either hate any Fear Factory songs that weren't off of Demanufacture/Remanufacture and Obsolete may be intolerant of change, and unfortunately, there is some change on this album. This also applies to the other side of the coin, where fans of the post-Dino Cazares era won't be used to this style of play and might hate it. Being a fan of several different Metal sub-genres have a slightly more "open mind", if you can call it that and have respect and appreciation for every album this band has done. But that being said, I do have my favorites out of their entire catalog. If I had to compile a top 3 list of my favorite Fear Factory albums, this album would land in spot #2. Just behind Demanufacture but above Obsolete. I'm a sucker for my first love, but 'Mechanize' gives that album a damn good run for its money, and by no means comes up short. It's all up to the individuals ears. A definite buy for people who love Industrial Metal, Fear Factory, or anything brutal with some mellow choruses so the drums and speed picking don't PERMANENTLY wreck your ear drums. I'm looking at you, members of Divine Heresy.

13 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Shor-T Zero
    webbtje wrote: It is worth noting that the heat generated by Herreras almost inhuman drumming is missed. He was replaced by Gene Hoglan. Gene Hoglan.
    Every time I need a laugh, I always come back and read this. I read the italics and burst out laughing. Probably the way I read it.
    randomucker
    lol, gene hoglan blows away herrera completely, to say his drumming is missed is...quite stupid.
    Soundservant
    nailsarecruel wrote: Seems like the reviewer's holding out hope to work for Rolling Stone someday. "Yeah, so this really fat guy came back to this band that sounds like a cross between Linkin Park, Black Album Metallica and terminator 2, right? And because of the drama in the band, they replaced their drummer with some guy no one's ever heard of. And OMG the singer croons too when he's not sounding shouty. Think a mix between Rod Stewart and Tony Orlando but even though he's older than I, he's so dreamy. And since like I mentioned they've got a Metallica/Linkin Park/T2 vibe to them, I totally give them an 8. Might have scored higher, but I can't stop thinking about Pink's performance at the Grammys. She was like so totally wet and spinning. Wow"
    hehe so true
    Slaytan666
    Mad-Season wrote: webbtje wrote: It is worth noting that the heat generated by Herreras almost inhuman drumming is missed. He was replaced by Gene Hoglan. Gene Hoglan. HAHA. Gene Hoglan, best in the business. His work on this album is amazing.
    While I do agree that Gene Hoglan is a far better drummer, I still miss Ray Herrera. Either way, the album kicks some serious ass.
    ashcook123
    webbtje wrote: It is worth noting that the heat generated by Herreras almost inhuman drumming is missed. He was replaced by Gene Hoglan. Gene Hoglan.
    Hahaha, this made me spit water out over my laptop. Herrera beats it up on his new bands debut album 'Years in the Darkness'. Arkaea aren't too bad. Raymond is trying something different for once.
    HardAttack
    I hate how apparently I "wasn't logged in" when I posted that 2nd review (8.3) in the list. That's annoying.
    Zell182
    Pretty solid album but still not as good as Demanufacture or Obselete. The title track and Powershifter are absolute monster tracks though.
    thommoboy
    hene holgan is epic and
    This Is Fun wrote: Great album. AWFUL live.
    They are epic live
    Zell182 wrote: Pretty solid album but still not as good as Demanufacture or Obselete. The title track and Powershifter are absolute monster tracks though.
    They have never made a bad album
    ashcook123 wrote: webbtje wrote: It is worth noting that the heat generated by Herreras almost inhuman drumming is missed. He was replaced by Gene Hoglan. Gene Hoglan. Hahaha, this made me spit water out over my laptop. Herrera beats it up on his new bands debut album 'Years in the Darkness'. Arkaea aren't too bad. Raymond is trying something different for once.
    lol!!!
    Slaytan666 wrote: Mad-Season wrote: webbtje wrote: It is worth noting that the heat generated by Herreras almost inhuman drumming is missed. He was replaced by Gene Hoglan. Gene Hoglan. HAHA. Gene Hoglan, best in the business. His work on this album is amazing. While I do agree that Gene Hoglan is a far better drummer, I still miss Ray Herrera. Either way, the album kicks some serious ass.
    I agree
    crackjunior1
    webbtje : It is worth noting that the heat generated by Herreras almost inhuman drumming is missed. He was replaced by Gene Hoglan. Gene Hoglan.
    Need I say more? If so listen to Dark Angel's "Time Does Not Heal"
    daltonsuter666
    ReiverOfSouls wrote: DieYouBastard wrote: gene hoglan ****ing rules dino is back where he belongs this is the best metal album since the blackening and the best fear factory album since demanufacture enough saidIf you, sir, were anywhere near me, you'd win a beer for that post.
    Hell, id buy him jager lol. This comment is full of win