Screamworks: Love In Theory And Practice review by HIM

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  • Released: Feb 8, 2010
  • Sound: 10
  • Lyrics: 10
  • Overall Impression: 10
  • Reviewer's score: 10 Gem
  • Users' score: 8.7 (140 votes)
HIM: Screamworks: Love In Theory And Practice
0

Sound — 10
"Screamworks: Love in Practice and Theory" is going to be HIM's greatest selling album to debut. As their fifth album, "Dark Light", was purchased by over 600,000 HIM fans to date, "Screamworks..." has been purchased by 200,000 is just the first week alone. I believe that this album is the true prodigy that Ville has been searching for throughout his musical career. Burton composed more keyboard riffs and intro's than ever before on this album. I live in Huntsville, Alabama for f--k's sake and almost every store had the album sold out...

Lyrics — 10
I know I am not telling anything a true HIM fan already knows about Ville's lyrics and his voice, but on this album, once again, you can understand Ville's heartache and sincerity by listening to the lyrics. However, there seems to be no anger expressed by Ville in this album... I believe that he has become fed up with his "creative depression", from Johnna and his childhood. Consequently, This "creative depression" Ville has been going through has made him a very successful artist and a savior to many fans. Anybody could listen to Ville's lyrics and understand that the world is a f--ked up place and love can literally kill someone... I understand the pain that he is going through just by listening to his voice, even in an interview. I just want Ville and the band to know that I truly, from the bottom of my heart, respect what they do and that they have more balls than any other musician I know (Zakk Wylde as an exception). But I will shut up now...

Overall Impression — 10
As I said before, there is nothing wrong with this album and does not compare to any of their previous albums, excluding "Dark Light". Their very popular single, "Heartkiller", has caught my attention in a very special way. To me, this song explains how one can try too hard to make love work between another. Doing this will only make that particular love flourish away due to the presence of "scaring another away". You cannot make love work and you should not have too or even want too. If this album was lost or stolen, I would buy all the albums available in one store.

5 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Bilawal
    tmarkov1 wrote: I'm sorry to say this, but this album is the worst HIM have produced to date. I've been a fan since "Greatest Lovesongs" and this is just...horrid. I can understand their urge to sound poppier in order to break into the US market, but this album undermines their artistic credibility in my eyes. Venus Doom was a much superior effort, albeit weak compared to Razorblade Romance or Greatest Lovesongs.
    Yeah i totally agree, this album makes them sound gay...
    Friar Tuck
    I love this record, again Valo has tweaked the HIM formula to offer something a bit different from the previous albums, but keeping within the same lyrical themes. Which is fine by me. Yeah it's poppy, but then so are some of their other albums. Venus Doom was a bit clunky, drawn-out and there was a lack of a decent melody at times, but Screamworks has a lot of ear candy. I think it's a really decent record and probably my second favourite HIM album behind Love Metal.
    hotsoupwoman
    I think that what makes this album stand out from previous albums is Ville's direct incorporation of his literary and historical readings into his lyrics. It seems like most of the songs on this album contain references. For example, a Catherine Wheel was a brutal torture device used in the middle ages. The only other band I can think of that does this is kind of referencing is Cradle of Filth, but that's done quite extensively in every COF song probably because Dani Filth has two masters in English literature. Sorry, I digress. Anyway, I think that making these references is something Ville Valo has aimed to do for a very long time. If you've heard their demo CD (I think it's titled "This Is Only The Beginning") you would know that their earliest songs contain references to HP Lovecraft and they have a song titled Borellus. References to literature seem to occur less frequently in their other albums than in Screamworks.
    PurpleDinosaur
    The only track played in B major is the final track. The back of the CD case actually tells you the key and BPM of each song.
    PurpleDinosaur
    hotsoupwoman wrote: I think that what makes this album stand out from previous albums is Ville's direct incorporation of his literary and historical readings into his lyrics. It seems like most of the songs on this album contain references. For example, a Catherine Wheel was a brutal torture device used in the middle ages. The only other band I can think of that does this is kind of referencing is Cradle of Filth, but that's done quite extensively in every COF song probably because Dani Filth has two masters in English literature. Sorry, I digress. Anyway, I think that making these references is something Ville Valo has aimed to do for a very long time. If you've heard their demo CD (I think it's titled "This Is Only The Beginning") you would know that their earliest songs contain references to HP Lovecraft and they have a song titled Borellus. References to literature seem to occur less frequently in their other albums than in Screamworks.
    Quite literally the entire Venus Doom record was a reference to Dante.