The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Review

artist: Limp Bizkit date: 07/26/2011 category: compact discs
Limp Bizkit: The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1)
Released: May 3, 2005
Genre: Rock
Styles: Rap-Metal, Heavy Metal, Alternative Metal
Number Of Tracks: 7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1), whose title threatens a sequel and suggests a concept album, is certainly a comeback of sorts for Limp Bizkit.
 Sound: 8.3
 Lyrics: 6.3
 Overall Impression: 7.5
 Overall rating:
 7.5 
 Reviewer rating:
 7.3 
 Users rating:
 7.6 
 Votes:
 62 
 Views:
 1,813 
reviews (19) 4 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: Scribbler, on november 14, 2005
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Almost a year and a half after Results May Vary featuring replacement guitarist: Mike Smith, Limp Bizkit releases a brand new album dubbed The Unquestionable Truth, Pt. 1. Although there has been a lot of animosity and hate generated recently toward Limp Bizkit, they have not given up. The new album, produced by Geffen Records features the returning skills of guitarist Wes Borland. Fred Durst made it clear that he did not want to advertise this album. The reason, to generate more fans. Having been entirely recorded in Prague, this album sports a dark tone. Having a slight Rage Against The Machine feel to it, the lyrical style of Fred Durst and heavy guitars of Wes Borland all meddle together to form that distinct sound Limp Bizkit is (in) famously known for. The dark, melodic tunes oozing from Wes' guitar heavily influence the majority of this album. He is back and this album proves it. Although the majority of the album consists of choler-filled songs; two songs, one being an interlude, are relatively slow in pace. The first single The Truth is a perfect portrayal of the new style they are employing. One thing that brings attention is the significantly short length of this album. Lasting a mere 29:41 may be enough to dissuade the average listener/purchaser. Although the second part of this album is scheduled for release later this year, this may not be enough to attract the attention it deserves. Although a partially sly marketing maneuver, it may not effectively work. The fact that Fred is releasing the second part later this year may either yield more fans or fail to achieve the desired effect. This could also create the opportunity to assemble a dual disc set once both are released, creating an increase in market revenue. Since the release of this new album, hype for the second disc has considerably risen. This album will most likely generate a new wave of Limp Bizkit fans. // 9

Lyrics: Wes Borland's distinctive playing style can easily be recognized and Fred Durst's lyrics carry the same groove. Either you like Fred or you don't. This CD has alot less "yodeling-rap" than usual. One song is followed by brief marching chant. Limp Bizkit always includes tunes done entirely by DJ Lethal and Lethal is considered by some to be one of the most talented DJ's out there today. There is no Intro or Outro track on this album. Sam Rivers does an excellent job on the bass in the song: The Truth. The rest of the album doesn't feature complicated chords but how much can a bass player accomplish over Wes' loud riffs? John Otto going into rehab halfway through recording the album, allowed him to play solely on The Channel but fill-in Sammy Sieglar does a spectacular job creating the necessary beats for each song. This album does not focus entirely on Fred's lyrics or Wes' heavy guitar riffs but on getting a point across and creating music the way it should be. Musically, this is one of Limp Bizkit's best albums but lyrically, it could have been a whole lot better. It all really depends on whether you are into the seemingly deep, meaningful lyrics or not. Although Fred's lyrics try to be deep, they do not always make sense. This album gets you hooked each time you pop it in the CD player. The more, the better. 01. The Propaganda - the drum style of Sammy Sieglar is clearly distinct, almost always started with the ever-so popular drummer "one-two-three-four" call without the talking but the beating of the sticks. An excellent opening track bearing extremely heavy riffs. Although the ending seems to drag on forever, overall, this is a very catchy song. 02. The Truth - also Limp Bizkit's first single, if you had to pick which song sounded the most like RATM it would have to be this one. With the introductory riff sounding so much like something Tom Morello would do, the song is fun to listen to and a good way to get an overall feel of the album. Although the singing style does not perfectly fit the song, it all works out in the end. 03. The Priest - this song portrays Fred's fantasy of wanting to be a priest molesting children. Musically, the beginning is mediocre but then, as the song progresses, it gets better. 04. The Key - an interlude. This could have easily been taken out. Once again, Fred overuses the word "f--k," just like he is known for doing in The Chocolate Starfish and the Hotdog Flavored Water. Lethal clearly backs this track up with his devious loops. This song is one of the album's poorest, it is a filler. 05. The Channel - the only song actually featuring drums by John Otto. A genuinely good song with a nice riff but not catchy. This song sounds more like a rant. 06. The Story - very basic guitar riff but well done. This is an "in-your-face" song kind of like "Break Stff." It is very aggressive and full of dark, deep meanings. A well-thought out song and full of grace. 07. The Surrender - a slow song and quite frankly, one of the best on the album when it comes to lyrics and singing. This is the only singing Fred does on the whole album and it is a nice change of pace. There is a lot of repeating but it all flows nicely. A nice ending to an aggressive album. // 9

Overall Impression: Overall Fred Durst makes it clear that he is full of anger and hate and he unleashes it all the way on this album. The opening and closing tracks are amazing. Wes Borland is back and so are his guitar skills. No solos, just heavy riffs that will make you want to go back and listen to the entire album again and again. // 10

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overall: 6
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: asdrummer, on may 04, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: I didn't really know what to expect from Limp Bizkit this time around, so I picked up their new album The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1). Wes is back, and it shows in the music. You can definately sense Wes' presence, because I don't know anyone else who sounds like him by the way he plays and the effects he uses. Drums are good, as always, by John Otto, who in my opinion is a good solid drummer. Sammy is an awesome bassist, but I didn't find many good basslines like LB usually creates. The best bassline you will find on this album is the one in The Truth. You hear influnces by Rage Against The Machine, and a little bit of NIN I would say. Production is good (which was recorded in Prague), but the music itself is very open to interpretation. // 6

Lyrics: Most of the lyrics make a lot of sense and are down to earth. They pretty much go straight to the point. You won't find any singing on this album, and the closest your going to get to that is the last song titled The Surrender, which in my opinion was refreshing after listening to he first six songs. // 6

Overall Impression: After hearing the first single "The Truth", I expected TUTP1 to sound more like that, if not better. Turns out, The Truth is one of the best songs on the album, in my opinion. Don't get me wrong, there are pretty cool riffs throughout, but it just doesn't cut it. The most impressive songs are The Surrender, The Truth, and The Channel. If this were stolen, I would not buy it again. In my opinion, their last CD (RMV) was better. // 6

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overall: 7.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: element94, on may 05, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: I like how Wes plays guitar on this album. It's not completely the downtuned power chords and simple riffs you would expect from an older Limp Bizkit album. I don't know why but the single "The Truth" reminds me of Jane's Addiction. I'm probably just being weird but that's what I thought. // 8

Lyrics: It's the usual simple Fred Durst rhyming and stuff, but used in a different way. They aren't quite as literal. There's nothing like Nookie where he just straight up says "I did it all for the nookie." It gets a little deeper (which isn't very deep but oh well). // 6

Overall Impression: A lot of people said it would suck but I love this album and think it's really great. The best songs have to be The Truth, The Channel, and The Propaganda. I would definitely buy it since I got it at Tower for $10. A steal for CD's (they still charge $25 for the Beatles). I wouldn't buy it again if it were stolen because I'm broke and it's on my iTunes and I'd burn it. // 8

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overall: 8
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: Kornbizkit5190, on may 05, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: I liked the musical aspect of this CD very much. Wes Borland is back, and he's back with a vengence. His riffs are aggressive and get you into the song. I like Sam's work on bass, though his lines aren't as complicated as they were like the 3 Dollar Bill Era. Excellent sound from the band overall // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics of this album were very good in my opinion, much better than some of there past works. But Fred does bring this record down. The way he raps and the way he tries to take style of Rage Against The Machine hurt him. He should have stuck with his old style of rapping, where he could scream. This CD did begin to drag as there no strong moments in the vocals, a few yelling points, but for the most part just straight out rapping with one singing song. // 6

Overall Impression: This ablum undoubtly is a very large step forward from Results May Vary. It shows that Limp Bizkit has matured in their music and hopefully part 2 will be stronger and more aggressive. I loved the musical part of this CD, the only part that was kind of a downer was Fred's vocal style, but still a great album none the less. // 8

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overall: 5.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 05, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Wes is back and kicking it up a notch. The sound of the new album was, more or less, a familiar sound of past bands. Rage Against The Machine, and even a little Metallica riffs found in songs like "The Story" & "The Propaganda," which wasn't too bad. "The Surrender" was the calmer side of the short 7 song CD. All the songs except for "The Surrender" sound like they sounded the same. // 6

Lyrics: The lyrics were straight to the point and plainly threw out there. The words of "The Priest" were sick and gross. I don't think Limp Bizkit fans want to hear about what the outcome of Fred's sick fantasy is. I tryed to tune out the other lyrics and focus on the music, but was let down. // 4

Overall Impression: Well to put it as bluntly as Fred would. I hope part 2 is actually worth the money this time. // 6

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overall: 9.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 05, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Wes is back and we can hear it easily. Even if John Otto played only "The Channel," the other songs are really good. Sammy Siegler did a great job. Sam rivers made some incredible riff, especially in "The Truth." Fred's voice seems a little bit changed, but it's good. Some people will say that TUT1 looks a lot like Rage Against The Machine, but I don't think so. Of course we see that LB has been influenced by RATM but, we can't compare these two bands together, LB is LB and RATM is RATM. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics don't have any meanings until you see the preview of the DVD. After seeing the preview, you understand very well that Fred is all about his life experience of recording the album. He's speaking about John who went to rehab, and much more. Lyrics fits really with the music. I'd like a little more screaming by Fred but it's ok. // 8

Overall Impression: The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) can't be compared with the other cds. It's not as the preview albums, but we can hear that it is really Limp Bizkit. I am a fan of LB since the beginning and I think that this cd is really fitting with the band. The only thing I dislike about this CD, it's because there's is only 7 songs. I would buy it again if losted. It's a great CD, hope you'll buy it. // 10

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overall: 8.7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 05, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound is new yet still in context with what is trying to be accomplished. The first time through I found the new effort very medium and lacking, but after putting the cd on replay and after 4-5 listens I was simply hooked. With this album you must come to understand it. It sounds odd I understand, but once you realize what is being done you will understand. Something you must find for yourself. // 10

Lyrics: Fred breaks it down and brings it to a new level for himself I'm shure. You really have to understand what direction he is coming from and when you find it you will be hangen off every word. It never gets old, it's something bold and raw, gets as sweet as candy and blunter than useless pencil. // 8

Overall Impression: Overall if I didn't give this album a chance like I did I would have been letting myself miss a really top quality CD which is on the first of 3 to come. It's just so raw I in many ways, yet the Bizkit paints another picture of themselves for us all to engulf ourselves in. It's a great album, a great listen, go to it. // 8

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overall: 9.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 06, 2005
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Sound: This is definatley a step forward for Limp Bizkit. Instrumentaly, this is by far their best album. The unique guitar styles of the returning Wes Boreland, rhythmic drums of fill-in Sammy Sieglar, and the incrdeible bass lines of Sam Rivers make this album great. The more I listen to it, the more I start to like the new sounds of Limp Bizkit. After this album, there will be much less Limp haters out there, and many people will be begging for more when "The Unquestionable Truth Part 2" is ready to be released. // 10

Lyrics: Fred Durst has improved drastically from his previous albums. He has some how deepened his voice, and added an agression to his music, not seen in his previous albums. He has also improved his song writing, to form a more "rock-based" sound. He still has room to improve, but I think his best will be in his next CD release. // 8

Overall Impression: After the extremely dissapointing "Results May Vary," I, along with many other Limp Bizkit fans were thirsty for the raw anger and aggression that came to us when "Three Dollar Bill Y'all" and "Significant Other" were released. Limp Bizkit is the comeback band of teh year. Hands down, the two best songs on the album are "The Truth" and "The Channel." These are both, aggressive in your face songs that make you want to start a mosh pit. I loved the fact that theres minimal rap, and that they sound relatively like "Rage Against The Machine" (musically, not lyricaly). Of course, the downside of the album is that it only has 7 tracks. If the CD were stolen from me, I would probably but 2 copies. In other words, get this CD! // 10

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overall: 8.7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Since the second Limp Bizkit album they were judged as the asshole band that is playing music the majority likes in order to make money. I always hated this stereotypes and dumb expressions, but I was one of the limp judgers. Hiding the Three Dollar Bill and listening to bands that stayed true (Deftones). But I think with this album they have done an excellent job and a lot of people who hated Limp Bizkit like the new one and a lot of people who liked Limp Bizkit dislike the new one. Who gives a s--t I love the new sound. Wes Borland is back. There is no one better there is no one greater. It's definitly a new style but in some way still Limp Bizkit. The story is really Limp-like. Reminds me of the Three Dollar Bill. // 10

Lyrics: The vocals are a bit deeper than they used to be. They are not as straight as they were like inresults may vary, it goes beyond. And except of the key it's not as rap-like as it was. I like that. The only thing I really dislike about the lyrics is the part in the priest. // 8

Overall Impression: I got the Three Dollar Bill album and I really like it, but I don't like the rest Limp Bizkit created through the years. I was listening once again to Three Dollar Bill, when I thought "I am going to check out their homepage for the new album." I hoped for something amazing to happen and it did happen. I watched the truth video and really liked it as well as the rest. The best songs on the album I would say are: The Propaganda, The Truth And The Channel. It's definitly a step forward for Limp Bizkit. // 8

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overall: 8.7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: MetallicAhead, on may 11, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: This CD kics ass! I was kind of disappointed in Limp's last CD but in this one they have really made up for sucking in the last one. The sound of the music in The Unquestionable Truth Pt. 1 alot better than the last few CD's because Fred Durst has stoped trying to be a rapper and has botherd to write some good stuff. Another good thing about this CD is that Wes has rejoined the band and you can tell by the guitar riffs. In this record I like the fact that there isnt as much slow stuff on it like there was in results may vary. I only have one bad point about this CD and that is that it is not very long, it only seven songs! // 10

Lyrics: I really like the lyrics in record. Since the Chocolate Starfish And The Hotdog Flavored Water the lyrics have improved alot. I say this because Fred has stopped trying to rap and actually sing about something that has a meaning to it. The lyrics on this record go really well with the music, espesially the base. I think the lyrics on this CD are the best they have ever made. // 8

Overall Impression: This is easily the best album Limp B have made. The music kicks ass, the lyrics kick ass, but the CD is just to short! Apart from that this CD is awsome! // 8

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overall: 8.7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: Kotex, on may 11, 2005
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Sound: The sound is great. On this album they sound a lot like Three Dollar Bill Ya'll. The guitar riffs are great, but the bass is somewhat lacking compared to their other albums. The drumming is decent as well as the singing. The best part about this album is the guitar parts. Usually the chorus and intro's are very good and catchy but I find that the verses are a little week. But overall, a very solid sounding album and it's great to see them playing harder stuff again. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are okay, nothing special. On Results May Vary Fred inmproved his lyrics substantially. On this album, his lyrics arn't as good as their last release. Although, they are FAR better then their stuff before RMV. I wish he would have keept going in the lyrical style of RMV though. Durst dosen't really sing on this album (save for the last track). On the others he is more or less talking, but thats not to say that it's bad. It actually goes quite well with the music and whole style of the album. // 6

Overall Impression: I really liked this album, although they should have just released it as a full album and not an EP. It's really good to hear them playing hard stuff, even if the verses are a little week. The bass and drums could have been better, they don't suck, but their just good there. The guitar on the other hand is in full swing and kicks much ass. Wes does an amazing job. All the songs are good execept "The Key," which is like a intermission type rap thing. If you like Limp Bizkit or this sort of music, then you should give this a try. It's a lot like Three Dollar Bill Ya'll and less like Signifcant Other and Chocolate Starfish And Hot Dog Flavored Water. If it were lost of stolen, I would definatly buy it again. I was not dissapointed. // 10

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overall: 10
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: Mudvayne1217, on may 14, 2005
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Sound: Limp Bizkit has done a great job on this Album. What I really liked about this album is that Fred doesn't really rap. He is more into just singing his metal. That was good. The guitar in this album is excellent. Also the bass in the truth is magnificent. The drumming was also very impressive. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics were also very great. The song "The Priest" was very different however, but I still liked the song. Even though Fred does talk about being a pedo, I honestly don't believe in real life that he is. So to me the song is still good. The lyrics in all of the other songs are really great as well. // 10

Overall Impression: My overall impression is "wow." It is a really great work or music from LB and everyone should go out and buy it. The only problem is that there are only 7 songs, which is very short. But other than that, it is excellent. If anything were to happen to it, I would def buy it again. // 10

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overall: 5.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: FAMMO-TWOS, on may 26, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This UnQuestionable Truth album is a not a dissapointment in the sense of where Bizkit was trying to go with their sound, except for one little problem: Rage Against The Machine already did it. Everything from the way Fred pronounces words in his vocals to the funk driven bass lines to wes guitar (only real jewel on the album) reminds you of an mediocre RATM. There is little creativity shown on the seven tracks but if I had to choose a fav. I would say The Truth amd The Priest. The music just sounds so forced and so not vintage Limp Bizkit even from the first LP. // 6

Lyrics: Fred makes little sense lyrically throughout the album and on the tracks where you can understand the message it seems as if hes whining about things that could easily be looked at as: so what. Such as Dimebag dying or his own declining fame. Stealing RATM's sound you would think that he would talk about something socially relative but pretty much fails to do so. // 4

Overall Impression: This album is not the Limp Bizkit that people have grown to love (or hate) but regardless I don't think that they should have switched their whole sound up to be accepted once again. The album sounds so fake/forced and unnatural. The best cuts are The Truth and The Priest and the instrumentation is the only thing that could keep this in my player for more than a minute. I would never buy it again and in fact when I bought it about a week later I sold it. // 6

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overall: 4.7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on july 11, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Personally I quite like the sound of this album (most of it). It's really heavy, Wes Borland is fantastic at making good heavy riffs and is about the only reason that I am still interested in Limp Bizkit. One of the main things I like is how loud the bass has been turned up, because in most rock albums you can barely hear it. Although I must say that the mixing was done pretty badly, they completely forgot to turn Fred all the way down. // 8

Lyrics: Fred Durst is really the weak link in the band, he can't write lyrics for s--t, in every song on this album he writes two lines for a chorus and repeats himself 3 or 4 times and on Propaganda he repeats the same lines for over a minute. When a song starts up it is good until he starts singing then I am inclined to turn it off. And it has possibly has some of the worst lines I've ever heard in the bridge of the song the priest e.g. "I see someone in rage killing Dimebag on stage or I have a kid, should I send him to sunday school so you can f--k him." Limp Bizkit would be ten times better without Durst and would probably lose some of the media stigma that surrounds them. At least he doesn't resort to saying f--k in every line like he used to. // 2

Overall Impression: The only thing that makes this album worth listening to is the music and seeing as that is almost made unbearable with Fred's so called singing. The best songs on this album though were The Truth and The Story. When I bought this album I was extremely dissapointed in the fact that it was: 29 minutes long for christ sakes; consists of only six and a half songs (the key doesn't count) and Fred pisses me off more than ever now because he is attempting to write serious lyrics but fails horribly. Would I buy this album if it were stolen, hell no! In fact ten minutes after I bought and listened to it I took back to the store where they told me CD's weren't allowed to be taken back. In conclusion this album is very dissapointing, maybe it would hurt less if it was at least over half an hour long and Fred didn't suck so much arse, but now I know that I have been discouraged from buying another Limp Bizkit album ever again, not even having Wes back could reedeem this albums utter poorness. // 4

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overall: 9.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: Misfit66, on july 27, 2005
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Sound: I really like Limp Bizkit, specially the bass, I rekon Sammy's awesome. Anyway, this is an odd album, very unique, Fred sings alot about things the way they are, and how wrong they are, if you get what I'm saying, which I think was a long time due since their Results May Vary flop. It is really dark and aesthestic. // 10

Lyrics: I think the lyrics where sort of eye-opening, as if to say everyone had been brainwashed, but fred's went wrong, and he has realised what's happeing. There's a song about how things have changed (The Story) and that is one of my favourite songs on the album. Also I think this will end up being a very contraversial album, because it is so left-wing and you can really tell what fred feels about what he's singing. // 8

Overall Impression: This album does not compare to any other music, because it is very unique, mainly cause of wes's return to the band. The most impressive songs were 'The Truth' and 'The Story', The Truth being about how people pose and should wake up and accept how they are, and The Story is about how influencial idols are and how people want to be just like them. I truly love wes's guitar work, and sammys bass, in every song they fit each other like gloves, and suit each other really well. I didn't really hate anything about the album, except for 'The Priest' which I can see being disliked by religious bodies because it accuses priest's being child mosesters and that fred can corrupt the church with he's evil and imperfections. The song also goes against itself because in the lyric's he contemplates whether to send him to sunday school so the priests can f--k him. all in all I think I would buy another copy if mine was stolen or lost. Good work Limp, later days. // 10

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overall: 4
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: jamstation, on august 12, 2005
0 of 5 people found this review helpful

Sound: I'm a huge fan of Limp Bizkit's old stuff. I know people hate them, but what I see is an incredibly talented drummer Otto, great basslines from Sam and awesome work from Wes Borland! Unfortunately this album seems to highlight the worst aspect of the band. You guessed it! Fred Durst has hit rock bottom with this effort! The band also seems to have traded its originality for a Rage Against The Machine style of song. The sound seems quite bare and dark. The whole hip-hop hybrid thing they've been doing is gone. Barring 'The Truth' the album is un-Bizkit-like and quite average. // 6

Lyrics: I think for the next album they should lose Durst instead of Wes! As far as the lyrics go, these are their worst yet. They're trying to jump on the political bandwagon with Incubus & Co, but please Fred, leave that to Zack de la Rocha, huh? Fred Durst ranting about politics like he's fought this fight his whole life really cannot be taken seriously. He's better off writing about good ol' teenage angst, ex-girlfriends and dissing authority. Thats wht we want from you Fred, not you singing about stuff you know nothing about! I mean, dont expect me to believe that you know jack schitt about politics. // 2

Overall Impression: Overall, this is certainly their poorest effort yet. I'd rank this even below Results May Vary. The only song worth listening to is The Truth. I wish they had included their version of Sanitarium. That might have saved this album. For me the best thing about the band is John Otto. They really need to let him take over for the next album. If it were stolen/lost I would track the thief down and thank him and probably reward him with 500 gold ducats. Keep your money in your pockets for this one. // 4

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overall: 1
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: unregistered, on november 26, 2005
0 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: I'll be honest with everyone out there, my expectations were pretty low for this CD. By low I mean I was expecting something slightly less painful than burning the soles of my feet with red-hot fire pokers. Lets be honest about Limp Bizkit for a minute, I'm of that age that I was around 13 when Limp Bizkit released their most popular release "The Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavoured Water," and as a 13 year old male, I was their audience. Now at 13, I didn't really know a great deal about music, and having been brought up on a mixture of Classic, Deep Purple era, Rock And Death Row Records Hip Hop, this nu-metal was bound to appeal. The problem is that was 5 years ago, and I, as Limp Bizkit's once "loyal" fan, have moved on. All of the people who liked Limp Bizkit 5 years ago have, or should have, left nu-metal to the crows and got into something else, something Fred Durst simple has failed to do. // 1

Lyrics: There are 7 songs here, but bands like Cult Of Luna prove a small number of songs doesn't mean a short album. This album is approx 36 minutes in length, Slayer prove that a short album can be classic, but quite frankly 5 minutes of this crap is too much. This is Fred Durst's attempt at a concept album is as much as all the songs have very similar titles. That's it, that's what Durst thinks a concept album is. "I see a priest molesting children, I see terrorists blowing up buildings, I see someone is rage killing Dimebag on stage." This is Durst being controversial in "The Priest" shit isn't it? The fact that Dimebag has been mentioned on this abysmal album is a f--king insult to the great man. The next song "The Key" is simply a bad Hip Hop record, the rest of the songs are too bad to describe. "You can laugh when I die" Durst raps... I'll be sure to Fred. // 1

Overall Impression: Yes ladies and gentlemen the ugliest man in shit music, not content with leaking footage of his undersized dick onto the net, has produced possibly the worse album I have ever heard. Fred Durst, 78, never really could rap anyway, but the shit he's put onto CD here makes his "3 Dollar Bill" shit seem less shit, that's how shit it is, very shit. I'm listening to this turd of a CD right now, and I'm contemplating eating my hand. // 1

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overall: 8.3
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: con job, on november 20, 2006
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Sound: On first hearing this album, an immediate impression is that the Limp Bizkit sound has gone through a dramatic re-vamp. Gone seem to be the days of rap metal with the edge of hip-hop. They seem to have abandoned a lot of what made them what they are. The hardcore rap metal is still there, but that tinge of commercial rap are gone. This album is purely heavy rap metal at some of it's heaviest. The album opens with the track "The Propaganda". There's immediately a dark feel, the guitar humming with feedback, until a scream from Wes Borland's guitar signals crunching, rapid, low power chords. Fred Durst's lyrics come in with power, and something different is very apparent. Durst no longer sounds like he's trying to rap as part of the hip-hop scene, but rather as if he's knuckled down and settled with this new direction the band is going in. This pattern of music continues throughout "The Truth" and "The Priest", until "The Key". This track is a complete break from character, with hip-hop beats, although the idea of the lyrics pretty much stays the same. "The Channel" and "The Story" continue in the original pattern of the album, although the radical lyrical idea becomes tired and weak. However, Borland and Siegler keep throwing out incredible riffs, and the drums fit neatly in. The last track, "The Surrender" is a slow but atmospheric track, with a very emotional guitar chord sequence. Durst sings, and his voals are pretty so-so, and this is a pretty weak end to the album. However, the earlier tracks make up for the album's occasional flaws. The highlight is definitely Borland's guitar lines. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics take a new turn in direction. They are much darker than to be found in previous Limp Bizkit outings. In "The Truth", Durst raps "Is the blood stainless? Enjoy the pain while accepting the grief. Are you finshed? Dumb f--king question don't let yourself fall asleep." In "The Priest" the lyrics are extremely topical and accusatory. "My demons can run around free. No one will suspect a thing. I'll show them it's okay to lust. A priest is who children can trust. I've found a new outlet to feed." There's a sense Durst is trying too hard to have a political, topical theme to his lyrics. "I don't like officials using rank to pretend they're not crooks. I don't like the tricks played on kids in those shitty teen metal books" (from "The Channel"). But overall, it's a pleasant change to be listening to very outspoken lyrics, and Dirst's anger is conveyed well by the occasionally earth-shattering power chords. // 9

Overall Impression: This album is spectacular in most ways. By far the most impressive songs on the album are "The Propaganda" and "The Truth". There are very few lowlights, although the weak last track really isn't the best way to end Limp Bizkit's most emphatic, hardcore record to date. What really makes the record is the atmosphere, made almost single handedly by the ever reliable guitaring of Wes Borland. The album is far from completely perfect, but it is a good step in a new direction for one of rock's greatest bands. // 8

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overall: 7.7
The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1) Reviewed by: khalood87, on july 26, 2011
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Sound: Contrary to popular belief, this album isn't that bad at all, apart of course from the minimal number of tracks available. The interesting thing about the album is its raw sound, which will probably remind you of their first album ("3 Dollar Bill, Y'All$"). "The Unquestionable Truth" marks the return of former member and the always eccentric Wes Borland. This time, however, drummer John Otto became involved in a fallout with the band due to his battling addiction to drugs. // 9

Lyrics: Lyrics sound mostly preachy throughout the album. Fred Durst seems to be lecturing rather than singing. In "The Surrender", for instance, Fred actually has the potential to demonstrate his singing abilities when instead he chooses to whine like a mental patient sitting in a corner. // 6

Overall Impression: "The Unquestionable Truth" is definitely different from the other LB albums, but is far from worse. Musically, the album sounds heavy and powerful. The production value isn't highly impressive, but I guess that was the original intention. A very unique and experimental album from LB nonetheless. // 8

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