Enemies Of Reality review by Nevermore

logo Ultimate Guitar
  • Released: Jul 29, 2003
  • Sound: 10
  • Lyrics: 10
  • Overall Impression: 10
  • Reviewer's score: 10 Gem
  • Users' score: 9.5 (46 votes)
Nevermore: Enemies Of Reality
0

Sound — 10
The original version of this album presents a rough sounding album. Nevermore had some production problems on the original release. I forget exactly what happend, but they were low on money and couldn't fix it up correctly. It still is a good album, but I prefer the remasterd CD better (released in 2005). I am a huge fan of Nevermore, and having listend to all of their albums to date, I say that this album is the heaviest so far. It starts off with the title track, "Enemies of Reality". It is a really heavy song that slows down only for the chorus. The next two songs "Ambivalent" and "Never Purify" continue to deliver head banging moments untill the album slows down for 4 minutes and 34 seconds with "Tommorrow Turned into Yesterday" where some of Dane Warrel's best vocal talents are displayed. "I, Voyager", a single from the album, is one of my favorite Nevermore songs. Jeff Loomis plays along side the drums with an off-beat riff that is simple, but really effective for the song. The next song "Create the Infinite" is another really heavy song and "Who Decides" follows up nicely with a face-paced intro that leads nicely into a slower, unique riff. "Noumenon", the next song on the album is an odd song that some people won't like, but I think it was a necessary part of the album. It stresses further the point of the album, and ends with a sitar, which is always cool. I like to think of the next and last song as a Part II of "Noumenon", as it repeats the lyric "there is no stronger drug than reality" also. "Seed Awakening", the song described above, starts off with a cool guitar riffs and then the whole band bursts in after a neat little tremelo effect. It provides a nice close to the album as it is yet another heavy song. The song also ends with a sitar to bring the album to an end. Overall, the album nicely delivers a lot of head banging moments while still having some slower songs to bring a nice tempo to the album. Everything is spot-on in this album, from the either hated or loved vocal style of Warrel Dane, to the amazing guitar riffs and solos provided by Jeff Loomis (which are some of the best that Nevermore has ever done), and the great bass and drum work.

Lyrics — 10
I think the lyrics are some of the best out of all Nevermore albums. Warrel Dane really shines on this album, delivering a great vocal proformance. Various lyrics are constantly repeated in the songs, from "they can't reach heaven" spookily spoken before some songs, and "there is no stronger drug than reality" in the last two songs, it really seperates itself from other albums. The lyrics are deep, well thought out, and make you think about what they mean. Straight-forward lyrics suck!

Overall Impression — 10
Overall, I think this is one of Nevermore's, if not the most, brilliant albums to date. I can thoroughly listen to the whole CD and not skip one song just because they are that good. On some albums there's usually one or two songs that you just go "eh, that song sucks, I don't feel like listening to it", but not on this album. It's really heavy and unique, definatly unlike any album I've ever heard before. If my CD got destroyed somehow, I'd definatly get it again. Great album.

5 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Nightstrider
    The only complaint I have about them is occasional nastiness ("Heroes and rapists, they all have nice faces" from "Who Decides")
    I don't see what's nasty about that. Matter of fact, that's one of my favourite lines off the album, it stuck out so forcefully and brilliantly - I think it's one of Dane's best lines.
    Pr0teZT
    This CD is one of my all time favorites. I prefer the first version over the remixed one because the rough mixing actually pumps up the heaviness somehow. The songwriting and performing is freaking great! Loomis is insane.
    mibe
    i agree with courval & nightstrider! another amazing line: "forgive yourself, for no one else will die for your crimes." outstanding album (after the remix&remastering), dark & heavy, questioning & virtuoso! buy!
    Rautio
    Does anyone else get a sense that the chorus in I voyager is ironic, viewing the modern voyager as nothing but a sex-driven drunkard? As in the mentality to do anything to reach one's goals. Or is it an ode to a hedonistic attitude towards life? The rest of the song kinda points this way as it suggests that the listener should have ambition and despise those who don't create - and therefore don't live life "as full".
    thePTOD
    Rautio wrote: Does anyone else get a sense that the chorus in I voyager is ironic, viewing the modern voyager as nothing but a sex-driven drunkard? As in the mentality to do anything to reach one's goals. Or is it an ode to a hedonistic attitude towards life? The rest of the song kinda points this way as it suggests that the listener should have ambition and despise those who don't create - and therefore don't live life "as full".
    Sometimes when I hear it, it seems kind of ironic. Some people don't like ironic lyrics, but as an example for a verse from the obsidian conspiracy: "Regardless of the consequence, We drown inside our arrogance, We chose to bring our nameless, To this place so shameless" So Warrel seems to write a lot about irony in humanity. Or maybe he's saying he's a voyager because he has (in the song anyway) experienced being a sex obsessed drunkard, so it's like he's been to hell and back.