Pretty. Odd. Review

artist: Panic! At the Disco date: 04/09/2008 category: compact discs
Panic! At the Disco: Pretty. Odd.
Release Date: Mar 25, 2008
Genres: Emo, Punk Revival, Punk-Pop
Label: Fueled By Ramen
Number Of Tracks: 15
Panic! At The Disco returns with a new sound, but the band itself hasn't changed at all.
 Sound: 8.1
 Lyrics: 8.1
 Overall Impression: 8.4
 Overall rating:
 7 
 Reviewer rating:
 8.2 
 Users rating:
 5.8 
 Votes:
 342 
 Views:
 1,244 
reviews (16) 179 comments vote for this album:
overall: 8
Pretty. Odd. Featured review by: UG Team, on april 09, 2008
13 of 19 people found this review helpful

Sound: Panic At The Disco -- you either love them or hate them. Two years ago, the band released A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. The album swept the nation topping the charts. The band basically became even with most pop acts for radio and video play. The band re-entered the studio in 2007 to begin writing a new album. This album has a different overall tone than A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. The band's direction in music seems to have taken a turn towards the better. The album itself reminds one of the Beatles, the Beach Boys, and David Bowie, to name a couple of influences you can see. The album opens with We're So Starving where the band claims that they're the same band, and you don't have to worry. The song itself gives a good introduction to the album and what the listener is going to be hearing. The song works into the first single, Nine In The Afternoon, which is a pop-rock song with clever fast moving vocals with a piano and a guitar to accompany them. The song also features horns during the chorus. The song itself is a perfect single and a great official opener to the album (not including the intro track, We're So Starving). After an outro of various string instruments, a blues-like guitar sound kicks in as She's A Handsome Woman begins. The song has vocals that vocalist Brandon Urie can boast about. You can tell that he has she'd his whiny vocals as seen in A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. Do You Know What I'm Seeing is a track that features string instruments, harmonica, piano, and drum set. The track itself is a very solid track featuring the entire vocal range of Urie. The next track, That Green Gentleman is a bright song that seems to cheer up anyone's day. I can imagine the band playing this song on a parade float and having the music itself (represented by color and the people are all black and white) cheer people up. I Have Friends In Holy Spaces features a ukulele, clarinet, and trumpet accompanying the vocals of Urie. The song itself sounds like it would be playing from a record player from the sound quality. The next song Northern Downpour is a ballad featuring the harmonious combination of the vocals of Urie and guitarist/lyricist Ryan Ross. The track is a dramatic difference compared to all the other songs so far. It is definitely a song that most people could relate to and like pretty easily. It also reminds you of Beatles' songs such as Strawberry Fields Forever. The song fades into When The Day Met The Night, which starts out with a psychedelic guitar riff. The song slowly builds up to the chorus which seems to be the lightest part out of this darker track. The song flows on to Pas De Cheval, a moving piece that sounds sort of like western-rock. You can envision the band riding horses in an old western movie. It isn't the greatest song on the album, but it's a nice transition piece. The Piano Knows Something I Don't Know sounds like a Beatles song in the earlier parts of the track featuring a variety of string instruments. The strings suddenly build into an upbeat sound that could fit into a suite with Nine In The Afternoon. The song continues on eventually to transition to Behind The Sea. This song is definitely one of the stronger songs, featuring vocals from Ross instead of vocalist Urie. Urie does accompany doing almost silent harmony vocals in the background. Ross definitely does a good job on this song as vocalist. It is also one of the few songs that don't have horns and strings joining the band for the whole song. Folkin' Around is just as the title perceives it to be -- a folk song. It is a worthy attempt at folk, but it sounds too similar to the Beatles' I've Just Seen A Face. That set aside, it is a pretty good song, just not so creative. She Had The World is a pretty good duet between Urie and Ross. It just sounds too similar to the album's influences to take seriously. From A Mountain In The Middle Of The Cabins is an uppity sounding song with horns throughout the whole song. The song doesn't really help do the album justice, but it does lead into the closer Mad As Rabbits. The closing track starts with horns and then brings in the the band itself along with Urie. The song also features Ross, who again is a great addition to the track. The song itself is single worthy at all levels. It is probably one of the few songs on the album that reminds me of A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. It is a great closer to the album though. The album itself sounds great. You just have to put aside the fact that almost every song lacks music creativity. // 7

Lyrics: Ryan Ross is a great lyricist. His lyrics are both simple and clever. Some of these lyrics can be seen in Do You Know What I am Seeing?: Clouds are marching along, singing a song, just like they do./If the clouds were singing a song, I'd sing along, wouldn't you too? /If you just knew what they could do./Oh, if you just knew, what would they do? Another example of these lyrics can be seen in Behind The Sea: The men all played along/To marching drums/And boy did they have fun/Behind the sea/They sang (hey! )/So our matching legs/Are marching clocks/And we're all too small/To talk to God/Yes, we're all too smart/To talk to God. // 9

Overall Impression: While this album could be labeled as a great album, it just seems like a Beatles cover album with no Beatles songs. The band just seemed to sit around listen to Beatles' records as they wrote this. There is nothing wrong with listening to the Beatles, but it just seems like the band is running out of creativity on their current four year trek in the music industry. I do believe that this record will push the band forward and gain more fans. At this cost though, they might lose fans of their synth heavy dance-pop-rock fans. This album can be appreciated by most people, once you set aside that they took a lot of Beatles' ideas and changed them to their own context. Isn't the music industry basically that though? Taking your inspirations and messing around with their sound? While this album does lack some creativity, the band did do a great job at making a record that is a completely different step away from A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. // 8

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overall: 7
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: takenthecannoli, on september 30, 2009
5 of 7 people found this review helpful

Sound: Disclaimer: The following review was written by a straight male listener, who did not, in fact, use intoxicants to get through this record, and was not paid by a little girl to give it a good' review. Anyone who heard I Write Sins, Not Tragedies one of the 18 million recorded times it was played on the airwaves knows Panic! At the Discoa pop/techno/emo/whatever else band whose actual talent was overshadowed by their adoring Twilight fangirls. Yes, they have some talent. Their first big success was 2005's A Fever You Can't Sweat Out, ' a record with so many genre specifications I'd be sued if I listen them, and 2008 gave us their latest effort, Pretty.Odd., ' a Beatles cover album which adds Baroque-pop and psychedelia to their growing list of styles. Okay, so you won't find Hello Goodbye or anything on here, and it's not ALL Beatles/Beach Boys/Byrds-soundalike, but, essentially, that's what the record's given us. Ironic, isn't it, that they started out a (Blink-182) cover band, and could only stand not being so for only one release? Despite fondness for the bands I've listed, I do have a few complaints. I love The Beatles, and always will, and having what is really just a cover band is almost like getting new Beatlesyou'd think I'd be satisfied that Baroque-pop was getting more attention, but I'm a little annoyed that Panic didn't make much of an effort to hide their influences. This all being said, there are a few non-Baroque tracks, those being I Have Friends in Holy Spaces, Northern Downpour, and Folkin Around. That's it. I'm satisfied with those and the rest of the tracks, however; I do think it's a brilliant step for the band to takeand, in all honesty, they don't sound EXACTLY like The Beatlesthey just sound like The Beatles Who Survived To Release A Record In 2008 With Fewer Harmonies. We don't see many releases of that sort these days, and, really, I'm pleased to see a return to this genre. Let's just hope that, if they continue going in this direction, it sounds a bit more original. // 7

Lyrics: The lyrics are Beatlesey as well! That's about all I have to say on the subject; these lyrics are about as close to Lucy In The Sky (God rest her soul) as you can get without actually being Julian (any competent person knows the LSD rumors were debunked). Clouds are marching along, singing a song, just like they do, His arms were the branches of a Christmas Tree, preached the devil in the belfry, Your eyes are the size of the moon, you could because you can, so you do, She held the world upon a string, but she didn't ever hold me, They all play along to marching drums, and boy, do they have fun behind the sea, the list goes on. The lyrics, of course, work very well with the musical style (they did when the Beatles wrote them, too), and the singer skills are fine, as usual. Panic at the Disco, meet my friend Originality. She's single and loves long walks on the beach, good books, and not thieving lyrics from John Lennon's diary. // 6

Overall Impression: Don't let my harsh judgement about the whole Beatles thing make any decisions quite yetthis is a good Beatles at the Disco record. It brings back some good sound, even if they're stylistic theives. The most blatant examples are Behind the Sea and Mad as Rabbits. I guess I'm so rough because no one else did anything like The Beatles did (well), especially the weird Yellow Submarine/Sergent Pepper/Lucy In The Sky/Walrus-era stuff. If it had become an indepentant genre the way Nirvana did (it did, to a degree), Panic at the Disco would be excused from the lawsuit's involving copyright infringement that I've frequently suggested to Paul McCartney and, when he still owned the songs, Michael Jackson, and, truthfully, none of it is so bad you'll forget it's not Paul, John, George, and the drummer. It's hard to compare this to the 2005 recordthey're both fine, but very, very different. At the same time, as the band insists in We're So Starving, Pretty.Odd.'s opening track, they're still the same band, and you have to admire them for that; not a lot of bands can completely change genres and still be the same. So, you can buy it, I suppose. I quite enjoyed itI think fans of the genre (or just fans of the band) will as well, though, as I said, fans of The Beatles and similar artists may be a little hesitant. It's alrightit's a modernized version of The Beatles that they pull off very nicely while still being Panicky and not sounding completely like a cover band. Still, let's see if this 2010 release will evolve the style. Or, perhaps they'll go for something more along the lines of, oh, I dunno, Elvis or Prince or something. God knows, it IS Panic at the Disco. // 8

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overall: 9
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: NineInAfternoon, on april 09, 2008
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: The band announced the title of the new album, Pretty. Odd. (which comes from a line from the song "That Green Gentleman": "Things are shaping up to be pretty odd/ Little deaths in musical beds"). They were inspired by the beatles and their way of music. They decided to use an orchestra instead of computer sound effects (like they used in their old album "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out". They recorded the album in Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada and at Abbey Road Studios in London, England. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics had a great vibe to it and went great with the music. Nothing was off and it seemed like the music and lyrics were meant for each other. Brendon Urie's (lead singer) singing made the songs even better. In this album everybody song and did it very well. // 8

Overall Impression: This album was more then I expected. Its songs relate to many of the beatles songs and its sound was suprisingly good. Some of the most impressive songs was "That Green Gentlemen" and "She Had The World". the whole album was great but those were the two songs that stood out to me the most. The thing I love the most was that Panic at the Disco totally changed their sound. one word, impressive. // 10

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overall: 7
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: unregistered, on april 10, 2008
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: Going against the common opinion, I feel that this album contains some definitively innovative ideas and musical sounds. Noting their progression since 'A Fever You Can't Sweat Out' is something that would emphasize their development and maturity that led to them dropping their. And in terms of the development of the musics size and idea of dynamics is something that is drawn upon throughout the album; the progression from the grandeur of songs such as "The piano knows something I don't" and "Pas De Cheval" which contain an array of instruments, including brass instruments and piano, which replace the heavy synths that featured more upon 'A Fever You Can't Sweat Out'. Their development has led them away from their synth roots, and has progressed into a more experimental sound that has been compared to the beatles, the beach boys etc. Their experimental nature is also expressed through the use of Ryan Ross (guitarist) not only in conjunction with Brendon Urie (Vocalist) but also having complete songs with Ross' vocals. Having his quite raw voice provides a pleasant counterpoint to Brendons more 'pop' vocal stylings. // 8

Lyrics: I must say that people express their awe at Ryan Ross' lyrics, with their apparent quips and humorist nature. However, the lyrics seem overly abstract, almost to the point of ridiculous on certain tracks. The lyrics were the sole aspect of the album where I was disappointed, as the blatant criticisms of 'A Fever You Can't Sweat Out' have disappeared and instead been replaced with quirky lyrics of singing clouds and such alike. However, certain songs did invoke a slight smile, even if it was not Ross' intention ("It's the greatest thing that's yet to have happened/Imagine knowing me" Pas De Cheval) it's seeming arrogance seemed too much for my feeble mouth to contain. // 5

Overall Impression: Overall, the sound has progressed since 'A Fever You Can't Sweat Out' and the album is miles away from where many Panic fans expected, but an open mind can lead to an appreciation of some of the finer, catchyer songs on the album. The lyrics leave extensive room for various interpretations, and are often repetitive in their sometimes too abstract nature. Some fans will probably be disappointed, but with their progression away from their roots, Panic seem set to attract new fans as well. If it were lost, I would buy another copy, although it would not be as heavily used as other CDs, however, more so than 'A Fever You Can't Sweat Out'. // 8

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overall: 6.7
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: unregistered, on april 21, 2008
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound on "Pretty. Odd." is good, but it's not in the style of previous PATD songs. Until about the sixth track, the songs sound like a smooth transition from "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out." After this, though, the band seems to have been experimenting with different sub-genres too much for this album to have the same musical consistency. // 6

Lyrics: The lyrics are uniquely odd, which fits well with Panic At The Disco's lyrics on "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out." It fits fairly well with the music, which attests to Brendon Urie's vocal abilities. Brendon Urie sticks with his excellent vocal range, hitting several high notes to compliment the music. // 8

Overall Impression: It seems that after track six, they were trying to sound a bit too much like The Beatles. It sounds "good," but not for Panic At The Disco. I would have preferred if they'd stayed on the same genre path as "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out." I felt that the pinnacles of "Pretty. Odd." were "Nine In The Afternoon" and "That Green Gentleman (Things Have Changed)." I am a fan of Panic At The Disco, so I am a bit biased in recommending fans of rock music to purchase this album. // 6

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overall: 3.3
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: raoulruby, on may 10, 2008
2 of 8 people found this review helpful

Sound: Now, don't get me wrong, I'm not someone who hates "mainstream music" as it's called today, and whilst loads of little scene kids scream out in pain when there favorite band get all big and popular, I think that it's good for bands, and fans alike, what's not good is when a band builds it's self a comfortable sized fan base and releases a sophomore album, which I persons can only describe is the single worst follow-up album ever. I was a huge fan of there previous release "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out" however for some bizarre reason they have decided to ditch there up-tempo synth filled sound and rip off effectively climb on board the NME bandwagon, a wagon filled of artists making terrible music, however because it's so different and 'original' it must be great, WAIT, this album might as well be a Beatles album, I mean every aspect of it stinks of the Beatles, again whilst not calling myself a 'fan' of the Beatles, they were a hugely inspirational and great band - of there time, well now there time has gone, mainly as most of them have died. Pretty Odd has acoustic guitars, kazoos, grand piano and an assortment of other 'weirder' instruments, and whilst musically the approach and outcome musically is one which is impressive, it's just not something that should of been released so early in the career, or even at all, really it's just a boring record, there are no songs you really want to get involved with, you can't move about or connect with any of it. // 4

Lyrics: Brendan's (lead vocals, piano) vocal skills are not in question with my listening to this album, nor are Ryans (lead guitar, other instruments that made this record so crap) infact there vocal range seem to of improved, but when the opening lyric on there first track of the album is "We're so sorry we've been gone, we were busy writing songs, for you" you can't help but think, what the bloody hell is this? Lyrically the first record wasn't that great, but this record, Pretty. Odd. takes us to an all new low, throughout the album it seems they have just tried to piss people off by writing lyrics which make absolutely no sense at all, and they are supposedly a band who do not drink, do not do drugs, so how the hell did they come up with some of this! // 3

Overall Impression: If I really had to recommend a song from the album I would say "Behind the Sea", whilst it's lyrically just as annoying as every other song on the album, there is a certain charm to it, similar to the lead single "Nine in The Afternoon", it is still not an album worth buying in my critical opinion, but at the end of the day Panic! could of brought out anything as the sophomore album and hundreds of thousands of teenage fangirls would still go out and buy and love it. The album does deserve a listen at least, just to appreciate just how a band can release such a brilliant debut and follow it up with such rubbish. // 3

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overall: 10
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: unregistered, on april 09, 2008
1 of 7 people found this review helpful

Sound: Panic At The Disco have changed a lot since their debut album, 2005's 'A Fever You Can't Sweat Out'. Dropping The exclamation point, and more importantly their dance and electronic influences, They've opted for a more classic rock influences, borrowing from the likes of the Beatles with potentially disastrous results. Fortunately, though the whole album sounds like a completely new band, It remains familiar enough to please old fans, while allowing more conservative people to enjoy it. It's still the same Panic. // 10

Lyrics: Lyricist Ryan Ross maintains the brilliance of 'A fever you can't sweat out', Though as well as the music, his lyrics have change a fair bit. While 'A fever you can't sweat out' used lyrical themes such as Adultery, Prostitution and Religion, 'Pretty. Odd.'s lyrics are not so confronting. The lyrics fit the music well, but are sometimes overshadowed by numerous dubs, such as strings, horns etc. Though Brendon Urie is a great singer, some of the high points, vocal-wise, are when guitarist Ryan Ross is singing. In 'Mad as Rabbits' Ryan and Brendon's voices suit each other perfectly, and create a sound that can only be described as amazing. // 10

Overall Impression: Though the first track, 'We're so starving', states "You don't have to worry 'cause we're still the same band", This is not completely true. While Panic is Panic, and They are still instantly recognisable to fans of 'A fever you can't sweat out', The songs are no longer dance orientated and more traditional, with strings, horns and mandolins appearing often. I would list the impressive songs from this album, but a track list would be easier. There isn't really anything I dislike about Pretty. Odd., save for the fact that, as a guitarist, it is a little disappointing to hear Ryan's brilliant and sometimes quite complex guitar work overpowered amongst the strings etc. Though I have downloaded the album, it is only temporary until I can afford to buy it. If I were to lose the album, I'd buy another without question. // 10

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overall: 7.7
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: DontFightTheFoo, on april 09, 2008
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: This is definately not a Panic CD. Not only did they lose their exclamation point, they also lost they Panic-ness. This album does not have a hint of techno or dance, something I was really looking foward to. I think Panic was trying to experiment with different music genres but tried to hard. They tried Jazz/Blues and even country! However, one of things they did nail is their Beatle-esque style. Lots of Sgt. Pepper vibes have been added to their songs due to the trumpets and string orchestra. All in all, Panic did an ok job with their album music-wise. Their singles, "Nine in the afternoon," and "That green gentleman" are, what I think, the best songs on the album. // 7

Lyrics: Lyrics? They're somewhat alright. One of the things I dislike though, Is the lyrics of the first song, "We're so starving." The music is awesome, but the lyrics state that they're sorry that they've been gone so long and that they have been busy writing songs for us... literally. They also say that "We don't have to worry because they are still the same band." No. You are soo not the same band. Brendon Urie still has his same, high, sometimes whiny voice. Not much change. I don't really have a lot to say about it. // 8

Overall Impression: Panics attempt to use new styles of music wasn't so sucsessful. in addition to losing their ever-so popular exclamation point, their funky, up-beat, dance music, I think they also lost some fans. Their wasn't so much I loved about it, and I only hated the fact that they aren't the same Panic anymore. If I lost the album, I would probably just go ahead and buy a different album. Pretty. Odd. wasn't exciting enough for me. // 8

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overall: 8.7
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: paquiquinho, on april 09, 2008
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: The unique sound of Panic at the disco presented in "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out" is completly lost in "Pretty. Odd.". It sounds like a diffrent band! Is that bad? Well that's on you to decide. Personaly I like their new style. More mature and well defined it brings back memories of such bands as The beatles or The beach boys while still being unique and innovative. They give that old unused music style a make over that sounds good. It is very hard for me to rate this because it will be only up to you and you will be in one of two groups of people: The ones who see it as a whole and grow to really enjoy it and the ones who find it offensive and aren't even giving it a second listen (wrongly). Being in the first group and having listend to the album many times I'll rate it a 9. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics are diffrent. If I had to give a color to "A fever you can't sweat out" when it comes to lyrics I would say black while to "Pretty. Odd." I would give a light shade of blue. Well this mind sound like a stupid comparision to you but I can tell you if you listen to it you will understand what I'm saying. Don't get me wrong though! The lyrics are still great and have that edge to them but intead of being what made most consider PATD "emo" they are more happy and romantic. Still sometimes senseless and cruel wich is awesome. Brian Urie is a awesome singer and writter. Let's boil ot down to this: If the lyrics are fun to sing along they are good. I can't stop singing so I can say I really enjoy the lyrics! // 9

Overall Impression: Panic at the disco really took a leap of faith with this one and it's only up to you to decide if you like it or not. The songs are really catchy and the lyrics fun to sinf along so I would say the album is pretty good but also I think the title is kind of right. I recomend you to listen some songs of the album if you want to give it a try: Pas De Cheval, That Green Gentlman (Things Have Changed), She Had The World. Those three are great I think. If You decide to get the album listen to it more than once. At first it will sound bad but it will grow into you until you can't help but dancing and singing! If I lost this one I would really buy it again! As for the rating it is a 10 for me but I'll give it an 8 because I understand it is not for everyone and may be seen as a backstab to the fans of the band. // 8

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overall: 10
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: !Heymoon!, on december 24, 2008
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: One word, wow, with their previous release(A Fever You Can't Sweat Out) Panic At The Disco started touring the world.With their big beat sound and heavy synths on the first part of the album and more conventional instruments on the seconed half the CD was a big hit.But Pretty.Odd.Leans more towards the genre of music that's on the seconed half of their previous release and beyond.To me, it's way better, while I did like a Fever You Can't Sweat Out, Pretty.Odd.Is a whole level up from it, it's beautifully illustrated lyrics and great musical ideas are nothin short from fantastic.Not to mention it does without some of the sexually profane lyrics and course language that's found on A Fever, so you could actually listen to it with your parents, I think this record is awesome and commemerate the band for doing such a great job.Certantly no sophmore slump here.The soun of pretty.Odd.Is well Pretty, Odd, Minus the odd, it has a wide range of instruments such as piano, guitars.drums, and even some brass instruments, The brass instruments are a great addition to the album, they can be found on songs such as their single Nine In The afternoon(Back To The Streets) and Mad As Rabbits.It kind of reminds you of Peter And The Wolf. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics of Pretty.Odd.Fall nothing short of creative, and great.Such songs especially caught my attention, those being That Green Gentlemen(Things Have Changed) Northern Downpour, and Mad As Rabbits.Ryan, Brendon, Jon, and Spencer do a great job with just writing great songs on this album.Some of my favorate lines on the albumarre,"I know the worlds a broken bone, but melt your headaches call it home." (Northern Downpour) and the final lyrics to the last songon the album,"We must reinvent love"(Mad As Rabbits) hmmm... never could find lyrics like that on A Fever You Can't Sweat Out.Not to mention the songs just have this happy vibe to them. // 10

Overall Impression: My overall impression of Pretty.Odd.Is that it is great, now while it does have some downfalls such as "I never gave a damn about the weather and it never gave a damn about me."But to thise of you who don't mind a little language (and I mean it's only in Do You Know What I'm Seeing?")then that won't affect you.And the only other downfall is, um, getting to hooked on it, I know I did.Brendon Uries vocal range is great and he has one of the best voices out there, and with the addition of Ryan Ross's (who is lead guitar) only adds to the CD.Brendon's more poppier clean voice mixed with Ryan's more rough voice is a great collaberation.They do a greatjob of dueting together.This can be heard in songs such as Mad As Rabbits(which is my favorate off the album).If you weren't a fan of Panic! At The Disco, you might just be a fan of Panic At The Disco, I encourage those of you who have not heard it to pick it up and listen, it may suprise you.I think this CD is great and if something happened to mine I would quickly buy a new copy. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: hannah.hearts92, on april 09, 2008
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound on this album pretty much varies from song to song, going from 1920s style on "I have friends in holy places" to folk on the aptly named "folking around", to something that sounds like it's stepped out of the 1500s with "she had the world." Each song uses different styles, and often will have different influences from different eras. "Nine in the Afternoon" Is obviously based on the beatles, judging from the music video, also the use of brass. Also with this album, there is little notice taken of normal chord structure, except perhaps acoustic slow song "Northern Downpour" Overall, this album has an incredibly varied sound, it contrasts greatly with a fever you can't sweat, and each song is different. // 9

Lyrics: Lyrically, the name of the album is fitting. Pretty odd. It is. Personally, I think there is an underlying influence of Lewis Carolls "Alice in Wonderland". Possibly. The lyrics, individually, tell a story, but the whole album doesn't. The two songs that Brendon Urie wrote, are more commercial lyrically, written about love and things like that, but with a sound that isn't commercial. Ryan Ross, however, uses words, phrases, and themes not often used. Also written about a varied amount of subjects, these aren't really the kind of lyrics you can easily relate to, unless you understand a deeper meaning, and often there isn't one, but somehow, it fits, and it works. // 7

Overall Impression: Personally, this is one of the best albums I've heard in a while. I prefer it much more to a fever you can't sweat out, and is much better than a lot of albums I've bought recently. Songs that stand out for me are Pas de Cheval and Mad as Rabbits, but I like all of them really. The one that stands out least is The Piano Knows Something I Don't Know. What I love about the album is that it has dared to break the rules, and although a lot of panic fan won't like it, a lot will, and I feel they will gain more fans. I don't hate anything, it's all good really. I recommend it to anyone getting bored of modern music and losing faith in progress. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: frank_iero_fan1, on april 09, 2008
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Panic At The Disco has always been a unique band, but this album really sets them apart far from the rest. The sound is, as the name implies, "Pretty. Odd". This CD doesn't have the synthesizers and stuff like they're debut, A Fever You Can't Sweat Out, has. A lot of the songs remind me of The Beatles. There's a country/bluegrass song on here that is surprisingly good. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics on this CD are amazing. I, being a lyric writer for my band, have fallen in love with them. Ryan Ross wrote most of the songs' lyrics, however Brendon Urie wrote two: "I Have Friends in Holy Places" and "Folkin' Around". They're all very good. It sounds like Ryan Ross sings in some of the songs like "Northern Downpour" and "Behind the Sea". I was really impressed with the lyrics on this album. // 10

Overall Impression: I've had this CD for one day, and it is probably my favorite. The best songs from the album would definitely be "Northern Downpour", "That Green Gentleman", or "Do You Know What I'm Seeing". The thing that I love about this CD is that it's so different, and you don't know what's coming next. I really don't hate anything about it. If I lost it, I would definitely buy it again. // 9

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overall: 8.3
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: ThrillerIOH, on april 09, 2008
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Sound: Panic changed their sound a lot for this CD. If you listen to the CD you will see what I mean. But it might be a good thing. They certainly did the unpredictable with making a Beatles-like album. I respect them for that. But I do think that they have to be a little bit more of themselves. I think they used the Beatles as too much of an inspiration. It sounds too much like the Beatles. But saying all of this, I am not saying it's a bad album. In fact, I think it is really good. Any fan that can accept a little bit of change will like most songs on this album if not the whole thing. // 8

Lyrics: I think that the lyrics of this album were very good but a bit inconsistant. No one please bash the lyrics on 'We're So Starving' because it is a joke. But there are some amazing lyrics on this album and some not-so-amazing lyrics. The lyrics on 'Northern Downpour' blew me away but the lyrics in 'Mad As Rabbits' didn't necessarily do so. Nine In The Afternoon's didn't blow me away either. // 8

Overall Impression: Overall, I think that this is a really good album. It kind-of sounds like a modern day Beatles but with a little Panic twist. My favorite songs on the album so far are 'She's A Handsome Woman,' 'Pas De Cheval,' and 'That Green Gentleman.' These songs blew me away musically and lyrically. I love tha this album offers a little bit of everything. I don't like how it's too closely related to te Beatles. I think we need a mix of the two styles, (albums) next. // 9

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overall: 9.3
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: decaydance_rokk, on june 16, 2008
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Sound: Coming from a person who has been around music all my life, and has listened to a lot of music, both good and bad, Panic At The Disco has seriously written over the definition rock. They have given a whole new demention to their sound by adding unusual and interesting instruments, such as fiddles, strings, and I am not sure but I think they might have used a hammer-dulcimer. Once you look past their actions and looks and focus on their music, and the meanings of the lyrics you can see the band in a whole new way. Pretty. Odd. did not disappoint me at all, and those who don't care for PATD should really try listening in an unbiased way. // 9

Lyrics: Ryan Ross has definetly got a talent for creating images with his words. He has taken the standard lyrics most bands write about such as love and ex's and thrown them away. He has used a lot of metaphors and allusions in this album, and it enhances the CD a lot. Using the sun and the moon in "When The Day Met The Night" was good symbolism for two people who are totally different but end up with each other because they embrace their differences. In "That Green Gentleman(Things Have Changed)" he gives a new view point to the band. They have changed their style of music, giving it more depth but the band itself has not changed all that much. They spent a lot of time finging themselves and the result was definetly satisfactory. Brendon Urie is one of the most amazing vocalists in this era, and I wouldn't pick anyone else to do the job. He sounds amazing live and in the studio. Some bands need to use tons of sound boards and voice enhancements to sound good, but Brendon is naturally a good singer. // 9

Overall Impression: Pretty. Odd. is really special because not a lot of bands are comfortable with exploring their musical talents and thinking outside of the box. Panic at the Disco has ventured farther into the musical world than most bands would ever dream of doing. I wouldn't compare PATD to any other band because they aren't like any other band. I think that Pas de Cheval and Folkin Around are really impressive songs because they have an element of surprise. Folkin Around when you first hear it sounds sorta like its title; a folk song. But as soon as the vocals come in you know that it is just a really amazing acoustic song with wonderful lyrics and a talented singer. Pas de Cheval is different because it is named in french and because this is one of the few songs that really has a solo in it. Ryan Ross has wonderful guitar talent and it really shows through this song. I love just about everything on this album. The instruments, the music, the lyrics. The only thing I dislike is that Spencer and Jon don't really sing in this CD. Ryan and Brendon shared vocals but Spencer and Jon were in the background. I would definetly never ever loose this album and if it ever got stolen, I would go and buy another one as soon as I could. It is one of my most favorite CDs. Panic at the Disco has definetly gone above and beyond with this album. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: CobraStarship, on june 18, 2008
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Sound: Contrary to popular belief, Panic at The Disco did not move away from what it was before as they came out with the new album. They are still the same people and the same band, they just brought a bit more folk music into their songs. They built up to the album fairly well but when it came out, fans seemed to be dissapointed. I ask them why? They just started singing less about sex and drugs and more about the aspects of life. Like in the song When The Day Met The Night, they talk about the love of a man and a woman through the clever metaphor of teh Moon(being the woman) and the sun(being the man). They also portray a more simple and carefree side to life in the song That Green Gentleman(Things Have Changed). Though the last album had many hits such as But It's Better if you do, I Write Sins Not Tragedies, and Lying is the most fun a girl can have without taking her clothes off, this album is still in bloom. It currently has the two hits Nine In The Afternoon and That Green Gentleman (mentioned above). The new album also has songs that are exactly as the title of the album states. Like the song The Piano Know Something I don't Know. Listen to the song and you will know exactly what I mean. But Overall I give this album a big 9 outta 10. Rock on Panic At The Disco and keep the albums comin! // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics are amazingly accurate to the song titles on this album such as the lyrics to Nine In The Afternoon. // 9

Overall Impression: It is in my opinion just as good as the first album and it should be treated with the respect that it deserves. I firmly believe that it is one of the best albums of 2008 so far this year up in the top ten with Simple Plan. It has a certain appeal that reaches out to not only dance, rock, and electronica but also to lovers of folk. // 10

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overall: 9
Pretty. Odd. Reviewed by: burnthearts, on february 02, 2009
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Sound: The very first song I heard from Panic at the Disco was "I Write Sins, Not Tragedies," which I thought was a pretty catchy alternative/punk song, but I still thought it was sort of mainstream in terms of instrumentals. As I was surfing YouTube, I came along "That Green Gentleman," which impressed me with an upbeat acoustic guitar, a Beatle-esque electric guitar lines, overall happy vocals, and in my opinion, a very unique sound that I haven't heard in most music today. After that, I began to look into other songs from Pretty. Odd., and immediately fell in love with tracks such as "Northern Downpour" and "Nine in the Afternoon", both of which had enjoyable music videos, as well. I finally purchased the CD during Christmas this year (2008), and I was impressed by the sound of every song. I think they took it into their hands to make a new sound for each song, and in my opinion, they succeeded. Even though it's completely different than "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out," I think that original Panic At The Disco fans (the ones that loved them with the! still there) will like this album because it still has that PATD feel to it. // 9

Lyrics: I think that Ryan Ross did a remarkable job with the lyrics for this album. Sure, you can't understand them at first, but there is a profound meaning behind every word that he writes. There's not much I can say about them except that they were superb in my mind. // 10

Overall Impression: All in all, I was extremely impressed by Panic at the Disco's work on this album. It was both unique and enjoyable, and I think they are at the head of a revolution to carve a new sound into music. Some of the songs that I enjoyed the most were "She's a Handsome Woman," for it's catchy melodies and lyrics, "Nine in the Afternoon," for it's upbeat and happy feeling, and "That Green Gentleman," for being the first Pretty. Odd. song I came to love. If you were to compare this album to other albums, I think that PATD shows both outstanding songwriting talent, and instrumental talent. // 8

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