AEX 250 review by Ashton

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  • Sound: 8
  • Overall Impression: 8
  • Reliability & Durability: 7
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 4
  • Features: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 7 Good
  • Users' score: 4 (8 votes)
3

Purchased from: James Music

Sound — 8
The guitar has a reasonably wide variety of sound (from warm and deep to almost twangy, but doesn't get too twangy). I have a DigiTech RP50 and a few Boss pedals that I use with the guitar. The humbuckers are great because they make no background noise at all, the only downside is that the screws fall out sometimes causing the pickup(s) to fall forward.

Overall Impression — 8
I've been playing guitar for around 5 years now and this is my second guitar (next to my first Hondo Strat style guitar). I play rock, metal and some blues, my main influence is Silverchair, The White Stripes and Metallica (and many more bands too) and this guitar suits it all (except maybe the blues! When I bought the guitar I had little knowledge of what to look for and didn't compare it to anything, but I probably would've bought it today anyway. The only thing I would change about it would be maybe the pickups and the neck inlays (they look a bit dodgy up close, they have clear stuff around the actual picture and look like stickers even though they aren't).

Reliability & Durability — 7
The finish on the guitar is solid and durable, but with the pointy tips it chips easily. The strap buttons are solid, but they get loose sometimes. I've used the guitar live many times and it's great, and I plan to use it many more times. Sometimes when I hold it standing on the ground I hear it crack/creak a little which worries me, but that doesn't seem to have done anything to it.

Action, Fit & Finish — 4
The floyd rose was set to default floating (so it can go backwards and forwards) but when I took it home the bridge was forward way too much and whenever I tried tuning it it came forward more, so I took it back and they adjusted it right. Later on I decided to get it blocked with wood to improve its tuning stability. The bass pickup eventually sunk into the body somehow (without the screw coming out) which I had to get fixed.

Features — 8
I'm not sure where the guitar was made, but I bought it new and apparently it was the last one of its kind. It's 24 frets of rosewood with a solid black finish with white/cream binding body. The body shape is a kind of star shape, but with an alteration to the front arm and came built with a floyd rose tremolo and locking system. The pickups are Ashton humbuckers and has a volume knob, tone knob and a 3-way selector. It came with it's original Case (not a hard case), Allen-key and tremolo arm (screw on).

6 comments sorted by best / new / date

    shawry0007
    You need to get out more man. I mean I know guitars are suited to personal preffernce. But **** man, if you`ve been playing for five years and you`re still using P.O.S Ashton you have some issues. I know from personal experience, that stock Ashton pick ups are shit. Plug some Seymor-Duncans in or better yet kick in some EMGs if you insist on still playing it. After playing for five years you must be doing some gigs do get a nice Fender or a Jackson if your strapped for cash. By the way get rid of the floating Trem. They totally kill the sound and even though you may have a nut locking system it`llstill go out of tune, they aren`t supposed to. All in all, don`t play gigs until you`ve saved up some money, bought a new guitar, a nice amp, etc. If i might make a suggestion, I currently use my 86 stratocaster (with noisless) pickups for a clean sound and shred it through with my Epiphone Goth Explorer. But if you`re into those genres that you say you are into get a Mesa-Boogie amp or pre-amp.
    loop-de-luke
    Yeah I know what you mean. I've never really done any "real" gigs yet or been paid to, and I only just got my first job a few days ago... But I know my gear is very dodgy at the moment, so I saved up for a Fender FM212r (I know, they're cheap and not the "top end" Fender amps, but they're still damn good), and now Im saving up to build my own guitar with good quality features (probably some DiMarzio pickups (I'd like some EMGs but the 81's are actives, which is a pain in the ass))... But for now I'll have to stick to the cheap stuff.
    -loop-de-luke-
    I'm only 15 by the way... so I was a young boy when I got it (I was 13 or 14) thinking that cause it looked cool it must be good, and I knew hardly anything about guitars either so I didn't know what to look for.
    loop-de-luke
    10 valuable years later and I'm cringing at the comments haha! Amazingly I still have this guitar in my possession, only found this review after googling the guitar to find out how much I could get for it as I'm clearing out gear. Indeed I was 15 at the time and had no idea... you can get way better guitars for the $500 I paid for it. Not an entirely terrible guitar but it did not stand the test of time, the back of the neck near the headstock is cracking away (jolly good). I now have owned nearly 30 guitars and most of them if not all were a lot better. Live and learn, eh! There's a reason Ashton don't really exist anymore but they tried I guess...