Horus-HGS review by Caparison

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  • Sound: 10
  • Overall Impression: 9
  • Reliability & Durability: 8
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 8
  • Features: 9
  • Reviewer's score: 8.8 Superb
  • Users' score: 9.5 (18 votes)
Caparison: Horus-HGS
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Price paid: $ 2200

Purchased from: Guitar Asylum

Sound — 10
This guitar is absolutely incredible to play and can handle anything from the lightest jazz to the heaviest death metal, and because of that, it suits my needs perfectly. It maintains clarity in low tunings and even in a messy band situation with thick, harmonically rich chords. Right now I am using it with a Rivera K-Tre going straight into the amp with an ISP Decimator ProRack G in the effects loop. I often don't use effects because I feel they are unnecessary. The guitar is not noisy at all and is one of the least noisy of the guitars played through my amp (without the decimator on), of which there are many ESPs, a custom Jackson soloist, and an Ibanez Universe and JEM. It has a nice warm, rich, full sound without losing crunchiness for doing tight palm mutes. The stock pickups are great and have this unique tonality about them, but I switched them out for a Bareknuckle Pickup Nailbomb and Trilogy Suite. And, though the guitar is a bolt on, it has just as much sustain as any of the neck through guitars I have played.

Overall Impression — 9
As an overall impression, when setup to my specs, the Caparison is easily the best guitar I have ever had and ever played. I have been playing for almost 5 years now (I have a full-time Job, and pay for my own housing and gear), and own a Schecter C1 Classic, about 4 years old, an Ibanez Universe (soon to be replaced with a Caparison 7 string), and a Jackson USA Custom Soloist (Also going to be replaced). I go through a cycle of gear constantly. If the guitar was stolen, I would probably buy another Horus, but this time with a different finish.

Reliability & Durability — 8
This thing is solid as a rock! Literally! The walnut body will probably take a chip or two over the years, but that's not a concern to me at all. The Neck is so perfectly placed in the body, it seems as though the woods meld together. Never has a bolt on felt so solid to me. The hardware seems perfect except the Schaller bridge. I have heard quality control has gone way down on those things, so I may have to do a full inspection to ensure that it will stand the test of time. The strap buttons were solid, but I still switched them out for some strap locks, just as insurance that nothing ever happens to this baby. This guitar is indefinitely dependable. I would never gig without a backup, but I guess if I was forced to, this would be the one guitar I would rely on. As for the finish, with matte finishes, they slowly can turn into glossy finishes with wear. And considering how thin the oil finishes are (which is done for tonal purposes) it can happen quickly depending on how you play and other factors. However, I already have taken some light hits with the Caparison and no damage was observed, so I think that the finish is trustworthy.

Action, Fit & Finish — 8
The guitar came with a near perfect setup straight out of the factory. I took it out of the box, and it was in tune, so I just plugged it in a played. The action was low, the pickups were placed perfectly, the only thing that I wanted to adjust was the frets, and the string gauge (10-52 gauge strings are way too thin for B tuning). The top was not bookmatched, but the guitar is solid walnut, so I cannot blame Caparison for skipping such a small step. There were no quality flaws with the Caparison at all, so no worries on that part.

Features — 9
Handmade in 2007. 27 frets, maintaining jumbo frets with a 24.75" scale. Solid walnut body with a maple neck, and an ebony fingerboard. Oil finish (similar to a satin finish) on both body and the neck. Strat style. Floyd Rose bridge (Schaller FRT-II). Passive electronics with one volume knob that doubles as a push-push potentiometer for selection between its 2 humbucking pickups. Where one is a regular bridge humbucker, and the other is a humbucker in the footprint of a single coil. The pickups are two Caparison brand pickups specially made for the Horus. Gotoh H.A.P. or Hight Adjustable Tuners. Caparison hardcase with wrenches to adjust the guitar.

7 comments sorted by best / new / date

    paul0461
    Demonikk wrote: 27 frets isn't really that many. Think of Michael Angelo Batio, he plays that custom 29-fret Dean and that double guitar. That's about 48 frets with one set of hands =P
    DeathByStereo23 wrote: OK,he mustn't use the 85 model for metal,but in my opinion the 81 type has a lot of bite and power than the 85.But it's only my opinion.
    29 frets is only 2 more then 27 so yea it is alot of frets more then your ever gonna need
    rfcbeach
    Twenty-seven frets? Holy ****! That's like, what...two octaves and another step-and-a-half on top? I'd think playing that note would be so high you wouldn't even be able to hear it! These guitars are pretty kickass though. I'd get the Floyd setup for DGCFAD tuning, put an EMG-81X in the bridge and an EMG-SAX single coil in the neck and wail that baby to Pantera and back!
    wesselbindt
    rfcbeach wrote: Twenty-seven frets? Holy ****! That's like, what...two octaves and another step-and-a-half on top? I'd think playing that note would be so high you wouldn't even be able to hear it! These guitars are pretty kickass though. I'd get the Floyd setup for DGCFAD tuning, put an EMG-81X in the bridge and an EMG-SAX single coil in the neck and wail that baby to Pantera and back!
    This guitar is suited specially for Drop B-like low tunings, it would be a waste to tune it to DGCFAD, you'd lose a lot of tone there.
    ibanez_freq_777
    It's pretty obvious to me that noone that I've seen make a comment about EMG 85s in this thread (save for one) has any idea what the hell they're talking about. First of all, 85s have more output than 81s, not less. Also, the midrange sweep on the 85 is far more suited to metal as far as I'm concerned as with the 81, I find I have to push the mids on my amp to the limit of what it can deliver and it still isn't enough (I play about the heaviest music u'll ever hear as well). I have never heard anyone with an 81 in the bridge live that actually had any true definition to their sound. You don't have to believe me but know this: always try something before you knock it, otherwise u end up looking like a true ****ing moron. U know who u are.
    blooddrunk
    hermz wrote: DeathByStereo23 wrote: trust me for metal you must use the 81 model He must use an EMG-81? There's nothing wrong with using an 85 in the bridge. Plenty of people do it with a lot of success. Personally I'd rather not use EMGs at all.
    Agreed ! Emgs are very overrated. SD blackout ahb1s are a helluva lot better !
    Im_Broken
    ibanez_freq_777 wrote: It's pretty obvious to me that noone that I've seen make a comment about EMG 85s in this thread (save for one) has any idea what the hell they're talking about. First of all, 85s have more output than 81s, not less. Also, the midrange sweep on the 85 is far more suited to metal as far as I'm concerned as with the 81, I find I have to push the mids on my amp to the limit of what it can deliver and it still isn't enough (I play about the heaviest music u'll ever hear as well). I have never heard anyone with an 81 in the bridge live that actually had any true definition to their sound. You don't have to believe me but know this: always try something before you knock it, otherwise u end up looking like a true ****ing moron. U know who u are.
    ive heard some pretty heavy music. so if you dont play anything more brutal than goregrind/pornogrind,i'll be very disappointed