LTD H-308 review by ESP

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  • Sound: 9
  • Overall Impression: 10
  • Reliability & Durability: 9
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 9
  • Features: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 9 Superb
  • Users' score: 7.1 (27 votes)
ESP: LTD H-308
1

Price paid: $ 630

Purchased from: Guitar Center

Sound — 9
I play djent. Mostly progressive metal and jazz, but I also play blues a fair bit. This guitar is definitely not suited for blues, but it still pulls a decent bluesy tone from the bridge pickup. I tune G-B-E-A-D-G-B-E, and I like the tone I get. I run this through a Peavey XXX and a 4x12 oversized B-52 cab, personally. I ran it through a Peavey 6505+ and the 60 watt Vypyr, Fender Twin, Vox AC15, Marshall 1987X, and a Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier at the store. I can't say it sounded anything less that superb on any of them, even the Vypyr. Every note is articulate, on all frets, cleans are full and jazzy, distorted tones are clean and chords ring out clearly. The EMG 808s are great pickups. The only thing I can really mark it down on is that it's best suited to metal and jazz. Rock, country, and other styles are possible, just not practical. And there are other guitars better suited to those styles.

Overall Impression — 10
I know I sound like a 12-year old with his first guitar in this review, but it just really is a great guitar. I've never walked into a store and plopped down $700 after playing a guitar for 30 minutes. This is a guitar that makes me feel excited to play it. That's the best quality to look for in a guitar; if your heart skips a beat when you pick it up, take it home. All of my friends are jealous, and I'm the only person in my area with an 8-string. If you're into progressive metal or djent bands like: Born Of Osiris, Animals As Leaders, Scale The Summit, TesseracT, Periphery, Uneven Structure, The Contortionist, etc. then you should at the very least play this guitar.

Reliability & Durability — 9
I haven't played a show with this guitar yet, I just got it, but it feels nigh indestructible. I doubt I'll have any problems with the body or hardware. I've never had a set-through neck guitar before, but I like it a lot. I have sustain for days, easy access, articulation, and all-around great tone. I've only owned it for about a week, so I can't say anything about long-term reliability, but it feels even more solid than my old Ibanez RG, and those things are tanks.

Action, Fit & Finish — 9
The guitar was set-up by the Guitar Center tech, because it was a main display model. I know the guy at my store, and he does a great job. Legato playing and tapping are just easier on this guitar. The hardware seems stable, the knobs turn smoothly and don't crackle. The finish seems to be very thick, and since it's matte it won't show scratches or scuff marks like some of my other guitars. I didn't need to play around with anything, because it was set up perfectly when I bought it.

Features — 8
Before I get started reviewing, let me get this out of the way. This guitar is so stunningly sexy it is ridiculous. I'm so happy after purchasing it, absolutely no regrets; despite the fact that I sold two old guitars and an amp to get it. My guitar is a 2011 model, of course, that came from the factory to my local Guitar Center. They had it on display at the very front of the store, but it was only there for a day before I bought it. Mahogany body, maple neck, rosewood fingerboard. This makes for an interesting combination; the maple neck gives notes extra spring which takes away some of the muddy-ness that I found in the Schecter C-8. It's pretty bare on extra features, with only EMG 808s, a 3-way pickup selector, and master tone and volume knobs, but it makes up for this in sheer playability and tone. Compared to the C-8 (I wasn't able to try any of the Ibanez 8-string models) the extra neck cutout and maple neck give easier access to the higher frets of the low strings, and extra pop to the notes all the way down the fretboard. While the C-8 has locking tuners, which are a huge factor with 8-strings, the H-308 sounds so much better. Some people say that the 25.5" scale is too short, but I don't have any problem with it. Play it and you won't notice a problem. The body is a pretty general super-strat type, blacked-out completely. Black satin finish, matte black hardware, and dark-colored square inlays on the frets. The only colors are the pearloid binding and LTD logo on the headstock. The binding looks almost camouflage, which is odd, but I like it.

41 comments sorted by best / new / date

    LeakyFlask
    ^Yeah, I don't know man. If rv says it's a superb axe, it's a superb axe. The phoenix has spoken.
    Jsteele1408
    shwilly wrote: So TLDR: for those people who think a 25.5 scale neck is too short for an 8-string: you might feel different about the feature were you to employ heavier strings
    Have you ever played a 25.5" 8-string with the appropriate string gauges? The lowest string (and the one below it) are almost unplayable past the 7th fret, because the string gauge is so thick that it bounces off the frets. It's abhorrently uncomfortable to play, because in order to dodge fret buzz, you have to push down extremely hard on the string. As you know, pushing down that hard on a string will also bend the note. So, sure... there's no RULE saying you need a larger scale, but if you want an extended-range guitar that's comfortable to play all over the neck, and retains tension without sacrificing playability on the low strings... you're going to need an extended scale.
    shwilly
    Djent727 wrote: With a 25.5 scale, your tones become muddy and you can't hear you're sloppiness. Especially with djent, which is a sound, not a genre. My 6 string is a 25.5 with 12-56 set strings on it. Lowest it'll go is Dropped B. 7 Strings are at least 26.5-27 8 strings are supposed to be 27-30
    First of all I don't think that "not being able to hear your own sloppiness" is really the issue with a muddy tone (most people actually prefer not to hear their mistakes, lawl): it's that your TONE ITSELF tends to sound very sloppy, which is actually more of a problem if you're a skilled player because your "tightness" and accuracy don't come out as well due to the lack of definition As for the "the more strings your guitar has, the larger the scale should be"-theory: I guess that makes sense BUT only if you were to use the same string gauge on every guitar (+ the extra string of course). There really is no such thing as a "rule" stating that 7-strings or 8-strings are "supposed" to carry a certain neck scale: if you buy a 25.5" 7-string you can easily compensate for the lack of tension by switching to a heavier gauge 8-string players don't have a lot of pre-packaged string gauges to choose from, and that's not likely to change since these guitars are pretty rare (although who knows: not too long ago it used to be pretty hard to find 7-string packs)... but that's why the Ernie Balls are kind of an "allround" gauge: their pack of 8-strings starts off with a .010 high e-string which might seem a little bit on the "light" side, but the low E is actually a .054 which is quite beefy, which is why you can use these strings on a 25.5" neck as well. You'd certainly be raising a valid point if you stated that a large number of people won't be satisfied with the results, but don't go calling it a horrible guitar just for that reason Im just gonna assume your privileged (not being sarcastic: Im actually kinda jealous) situation of working with guitars all day has brought you some 8-string experience (I mean, itd be EXTRA silly if you hadnt cos why comment on this review if you have no clue what youre talking about) in which case Im guessing youre already used to combining different string sets to get your own custom gauge because theres no way those regular 8-string sets are satisfactory for you. Now just imagine someone else combining those Not Even Slinkys you use on your regular guitar (which are like the heaviest "regular" strings EB offers out of their like 8 standard gauges) with the 2 lowest strings from the regular 8-string package: Im pretty sure a lot of people would find that setup pretty damn extreme when encountered on a guitar with a 27+ scale neck (especially those who aren't into genres that end with "core"), and even on this guitar they might still feel its a tad on the radical side (like the guy who reviewed this instrument and doesnt seem to have a problem with it) So TLDR: for those people who think a 25.5 scale neck is too short for an 8-string: you might feel different about the feature were you to employ heavier strings
    shwilly
    Djent727 wrote: With a 25.5 scale, your tones become muddy and you can't hear you're sloppiness. Especially with djent, which is a sound, not a genre. My 6 string is a 25.5 with 12-56 set strings on it. Lowest it'll go is Dropped B. 7 Strings are at least 26.5-27 8 strings are supposed to be 27-30
    First of all I don't think that "not being able to hear your own sloppiness" is really the issue with a muddy tone (most people actually prefer not to hear their mistakes, lawl): it's that your TONE ITSELF tends to sound very sloppy, which is actually more of a problem if you're a skilled player because your "tightness" and accuracy don't come out as well due to the lack of definition As for the "the more strings your guitar has, the larger the scale should be"-theory: I guess that makes sense BUT only if you were to use the same string gauge on every guitar (+ the extra string of course). There really is no such thing as a "rule" stating that 7-strings or 8-strings are "supposed" to carry a certain neck scale: if you buy a 25.5" 7-string you can easily compensate for the lack of tension by switching to a heavier gauge 8-string players don't have a lot of pre-packaged string gauges to choose from, and that's not likely to change since these guitars are pretty rare (although who knows: not too long ago it used to be pretty hard to find 7-string packs)... but that's why the Ernie Balls are kind of an "allround" gauge: their pack of 8-strings starts off with a .010 high e-string which might seem a little bit on the "light" side, but the low E is actually a .054 which is quite beefy, which is why you can use these strings on a 25.5" neck as well. You'd certainly be raising a valid point if you stated that a large number of people won't be satisfied with the results, but don't go calling it a horrible guitar just for that reason Im just gonna assume your privileged (not being sarcastic: Im actually kinda jealous) situation of working with guitars all day has brought you some 8-string experience (I mean, itd be EXTRA silly if you hadnt cos why comment on this review if you have no clue what youre talking about) in which case Im guessing youre already used to combining different string sets to get your own custom gauge because theres no way those regular 8-string sets are satisfactory for you. Now just imagine someone else combining those Not Even Slinkys you use on your regular guitar (which are like the heaviest "regular" strings EB offers out of their like 8 standard gauges) with the 2 lowest strings from the regular 8-string package: Im pretty sure a lot of people would find that setup pretty damn extreme when encountered on a guitar with a 27+ scale neck (especially those who aren't into genres that end with "core"), and even on this guitar they might still feel its a tad on the radical side (like the guy who reviewed this instrument and doesnt seem to have a problem with it) So TLDR: for those people who think a 25.5 scale neck is too short for an 8-string: you might feel different about the feature were you to employ heavier strings...
    smartalecG94
    im with steele on this...extended range is the way to go if you feel like playing anything down the fretboard. HOWEVER i checked this guitar out at guitar center and it didnt sound muddy at all through a marshall half stack...
    Jsteele1408
    shwilly wrote: Not really: I've only toyed around with one of these (actually, I think it was a 25.5" Carvin) but I understand what you're on about -> I have been helping a friend set up some of his guitars with those Zakk Wylde strings (which are like .011 - .060's) and its a real b*tch to adjust the action without having 'em buzz like crazy Still, even though I've never been a fan of those uber thick "ship mast wire rope" strings in the first place I always opt for 7-strings with a 25.5 scale and bigger string gauge. Just a matter of preference, I really dont like guitars with bass-like necks. And Im pretty sure Im not the only one, otherwise they pbbly wouldnt make these guitars in the first place. If made properly there usually is a market for "untypical" instruments such as this one
    I actually do agree with you. I actually am selling my Agile 727, and bought an RG7321 because I find the longer scale to hinder my playing. Just more difficult to get from place to place.
    DoubleBassCrash
    ticklemeemo wrote: How many people have actually played this guitar?
    +1 How many of you talking about the scale length has actually played an 8 string for that matter? 27" is where it's at, I have an 8 string, I'd like to have a 30" scale, that ain't gonna happen unless I get a custom. But seriously, dont take my word for it, hop on over to SS.ORG and see what they have to say about scale length on 8 strings. 25.5 is alright for a 7, but for an 8, not so much. Sure, you can compensate it with thicker strings, just like you could if you wanted to tune Octave E on a six string that wasn't baritone, but the bottom line is the 27" is more flexible. I've had a .059 on a 25.5 scale seven string and the B being dropped to A didn't sound good at all with the .059. So how would 25.5 scale be good for an 8 string if the F# and B were dropped to E and A? It would muddy up pretty bad. Sure, a .070 or .072 for the A and a .080 for the E would remedy it, but if you wanted to drop the notes further, youd lose the flexibility that the 27 would provide.
    totallyretarded
    Kortez3000 wrote: Don't people usually just play, ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -0 00-0-000-0-000-0-000- with 8 string guitars anyways?
    obvi ous troll is obvious
    d-340
    Just got one myself. Gotta say the scale is no problem for me, I run the low F# all the way up to the 12th fret no problem. But then again I just keep it in standard E, and I'm playing thrash, nothing progressive or "djent". This guitar is gorgeous, definitely easy to play, and makes the jump from a 6 to an 8 nearly effortless. The only thing I plan on doing is swappin' the pups for Blackouts.
    Blargaha
    Djent727 wrote: Having heavier strings requires a longer scale -_____- sooo ipso facto. 25.5 Is too damn short for an 8 string, borderline ok for a 7
    Where does it say that? Is there a rule about that? I use regular 10-59 on my baritone sevenstring, works like a charm. I have just recently started using them, before that I used 10-52, and I tune down to A. But what could anyone expect from someone with a username with "djent" in it? Come on... You know yourselves that you are the hipsters of progressive metal...
    Djent727
    That's a horrible guitar, The Schecter ATX C8 is much better, Any Ibanez 8 string is better. If you want a real 8 string go for an Agile multi scale 27-30. With a 25.5 scale, your tones become muddy and you can't hear you're sloppiness. Especially with djent, which is a sound, not a genre. My 6 string is a 25.5 with 12-56 set strings on it. Lowest it'll go is Dropped B. 7 Strings are at least 26.5-27 8 strings are supposed to be 27-30. Though you had an accurate review, just on a bad guitar.
    Kortez3000
    Don't people usually just play, ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -0 00-0-000-0-000-0-000- with 8 string guitars anyways?
    Djent727
    shwilly wrote: Djent727 wrote: With a 25.5 scale, your tones become muddy and you can't hear you're sloppiness. Especially with djent, which is a sound, not a genre. My 6 string is a 25.5 with 12-56 set strings on it. Lowest it'll go is Dropped B. 7 Strings are at least 26.5-27 8 strings are supposed to be 27-30 First of all I don't think that "not being able to hear your own sloppiness" is really the issue with a muddy tone (most people actually prefer not to hear their mistakes, lawl): it's that your TONE ITSELF tends to sound very sloppy, which is actually more of a problem if you're a skilled player because your "tightness" and accuracy don't come out as well due to the lack of definition As for the "the more strings your guitar has, the larger the scale should be"-theory: I guess that makes sense BUT only if you were to use the same string gauge on every guitar (+ the extra string of course). There really is no such thing as a "rule" stating that 7-strings or 8-strings are "supposed" to carry a certain neck scale: if you buy a 25.5" 7-string you can easily compensate for the lack of tension by switching to a heavier gauge 8-string players don't have a lot of pre-packaged string gauges to choose from, and that's not likely to change since these guitars are pretty rare (although who knows: not too long ago it used to be pretty hard to find 7-string packs)... but that's why the Ernie Balls are kind of an "allround" gauge: their pack of 8-strings starts off with a .010 high e-string which might seem a little bit on the "light" side, but the low E is actually a .054 which is quite beefy, which is why you can use these strings on a 25.5" neck as well. You'd certainly be raising a valid point if you stated that a large number of people won't be satisfied with the results, but don't go calling it a horrible guitar just for that reason Im just gonna assume your privileged (not being sarcastic: Im actually kinda jealous) situation of working with guitars all day has brought you some 8-string experience (I mean, itd be EXTRA silly if you hadnt cos why comment on this review if you have no clue what youre talking about) in which case Im guessing youre already used to combining different string sets to get your own custom gauge because theres no way those regular 8-string sets are satisfactory for you. Now just imagine someone else combining those Not Even Slinkys you use on your regular guitar (which are like the heaviest "regular" strings EB offers out of their like 8 standard gauges) with the 2 lowest strings from the regular 8-string package: Im pretty sure a lot of people would find that setup pretty damn extreme when encountered on a guitar with a 27+ scale neck (especially those who aren't into genres that end with "core"), and even on this guitar they might still feel its a tad on the radical side (like the guy who reviewed this instrument and doesnt seem to have a problem with it) So TLDR: for those people who think a 25.5 scale neck is too short for an 8-string: you might feel different about the feature were you to employ heavier strings...
    Having heavier strings requires a longer scale -_____- sooo ipso facto. 25.5 Is too damn short for an 8 string, borderline ok for a 7
    Djent727
    I play djent and progressive rock. I know what im talking about, I also work with guitars all day. Phoenix, could very well be basing it off looks or his somewhat knowledge of guitars.
    PrimitiveGuitar
    Also this was the only 8 string within my price range that i actually liked ( due to some terrible features on other guitars ) and since it was the only one i found that i liked i chose to buy it, despite the 25.5" scale. Plus for someone who has never owned an 8 string or baritone guitar before getting used to the neck of the 8 AS WELL AS the baritone scale would be a bit too much do you think? ( especially since i don't have the largest of hands ). And in the end it all comes down to personal preference. I couldn't care about my 25.5" scale, sure it buzzes a bit in some places ( with stock strings as i haven't experimented with any other yet ) but i really don't mind that.
    PrimitiveGuitar
    That's a horrible guitar, The Schecter ATX C8 is much better, Any Ibanez 8 string is better. If you want a real 8 string go for an Agile multi scale 27-30. With a 25.5 scale, your tones become muddy and you can't hear you're sloppiness. Especially with djent, which is a sound, not a genre. My 6 string is a 25.5 with 12-56 set strings on it. Lowest it'll go is Dropped B. 7 Strings are at least 26.5-27 8 strings are supposed to be 27-30. Though you had an accurate review, just on a bad guitar
    Plus all these people who hating hating on me because i play "djent" and they say its not a genre, i never referred to it as a genre. its a sound, style and technique, Suprised i got so many comments in one day :O
    sewoo55
    Kortez3000 wrote: Don't people usually just play, ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -0 00-0-000-0-000-0-000- with 8 string guitars anyways?
    fc uk you
    a_hub10
    My buddy had one of these for a week. Build quality was great, but as a players guitar this is shit. If you actually plan on using all 8 strings look elsewhere. ESP has yet to learn that 25.5 does not work well on ERGs.
    StillSublime
    Jsteele1408 wrote: shwilly wrote: So TLDR: for those people who think a 25.5 scale neck is too short for an 8-string: you might feel different about the feature were you to employ heavier strings Have you ever played a 25.5" 8-string with the appropriate string gauges? The lowest string (and the one below it) are almost unplayable past the 7th fret, because the string gauge is so thick that it bounces off the frets. It's abhorrently uncomfortable to play, because in order to dodge fret buzz, you have to push down extremely hard on the string. As you know, pushing down that hard on a string will also bend the note. So, sure... there's no RULE saying you need a larger scale, but if you want an extended-range guitar that's comfortable to play all over the neck, and retains tension without sacrificing playability on the low strings... you're going to need an extended scale.
    You don't know how to play guitar. You don't just press harder, you play closer to the fret. But that shouldn't be a problem, because if you play almost directly on the fret, you get a fine tone without having to press hard. /L2play
    GS LEAD 5
    Djent727 wrote: That's a horrible guitar, The Schecter ATX C8 is much better, Any Ibanez 8 string is better. If you want a real 8 string go for an Agile multi scale 27-30. With a 25.5 scale, your tones become muddy and you can't hear you're sloppiness. Especially with djent, which is a sound, not a genre. My 6 string is a 25.5 with 12-56 set strings on it. Lowest it'll go is Dropped B. 7 Strings are at least 26.5-27 8 strings are supposed to be 27-30. Though you had an accurate review, just on a bad guitar.
    How far do you want to drop the notes? For going below E, you WILL need a bigger scale. But if you dont need to go that low 25.5 works fine. I've got an H-51 in A standard with 14's thats tighter than an MH-100 in E standard with 9's. And its perfectly playable with zero buzzing all the way down to G. What you are talking about is less about quality and more about personal preference, like the debate on 34'' scale basses vs 30'' scale basses. Both get the job done, albeit in different ways.
    a drummer
    i tune to Ab on a 6 string..had to make some tweaks...but sounds great and I use 14-70 gauged strings. Too broke to afford the seven that i want, but my Ibby RG drops tunings just fine
    DoubleBassCrash
    Blargaha wrote: DoubleBassCrash wrote: I do have an account @ SS, I don't post much, though. I knew you were talking to someone else, too, it's all groovy. Still waiting for the day I see Meshuggah's signature 8 string limited run get released! ^_^, one of these days! Then I'll have two 8 strings I love tremendously! Weren't they going to be like 5000$+ or something?
    woopsy, haha, put that in quotes Yep, but I'm hoping more along the lines of the 3.5-4k range, but it's a price I'd be happy to pay, too bad they won't offer it a la Fredrik Thordendal ICEMAN, it'll still be a wicked RG. My only gripe with it is the electronics, one bridge pup & a volume knob, no tone knob ~_~, but regardless, it'll be a kickass instrument!
    DoubleBassCrash
    Blargaha wrote: DoubleBassCrash wrote: I do have an account @ SS, I don't post much, though. I knew you were talking to someone else, too, it's all groovy. Yep, but I'm hoping more along the lines of the 3.5-4k range, but it's a price I'd be happy to pay, too bad they won't offer it a la Fredrik Thordendal ICEMAN, it'll still be a wicked RG. My only gripe with it is the electronics, one bridge pup & a volume knob, no tone knob ~_~, but regardless, it'll be a kickass instrument! Still waiting for the day I see Meshuggah's signature 8 string limited run get released! ^_^, one of these days! Then I'll have two 8 strings I love tremendously! Weren't they going to be like 5000$+ or something?
    Blargaha
    DoubleBassCrash wrote: I do have an account @ SS, I don't post much, though. I knew you were talking to someone else, too, it's all groovy. Still waiting for the day I see Meshuggah's signature 8 string limited run get released! ^_^, one of these days! Then I'll have two 8 strings I love tremendously!
    Weren't they going to be like 5000$+ or something?
    DoubleBassCrash
    Blargaha wrote: DoubleBassCrash wrote: How many of you talking about the scale length has actually played an 8 string for that matter? 27" is where it's at, I have an 8 string, I'd like to have a 30" scale, that ain't gonna happen unless I get a custom. But seriously, dont take my word for it, hop on over to SS.ORG and see what they have to say about scale length on 8 strings. 25.5 is alright for a 7, but for an 8, not so much. Sure, you can compensate it with thicker strings, just like you could if you wanted to tune Octave E on a six string that wasn't baritone, but the bottom line is the 27" is more flexible. I've had a .059 on a 25.5 scale seven string and the B being dropped to A didn't sound good at all with the .059. So how would 25.5 scale be good for an 8 string if the F# and B were dropped to E and A? It would muddy up pretty bad. Sure, a .070 or .072 for the A and a .080 for the E would remedy it, but if you wanted to drop the notes further, youd lose the flexibility that the 27 would provide. Well, hello there. You a memeber? And my comment below, was not directed at you, but you were too fast with writing yours...
    I do have an account @ SS, I don't post much, though. I knew you were talking to someone else, too, it's all groovy. Still waiting for the day I see Meshuggah's signature 8 string limited run get released! ^_^, one of these days! Then I'll have two 8 strings I love tremendously!
    Blargaha
    DoubleBassCrash wrote: How many of you talking about the scale length has actually played an 8 string for that matter? 27" is where it's at, I have an 8 string, I'd like to have a 30" scale, that ain't gonna happen unless I get a custom. But seriously, dont take my word for it, hop on over to SS.ORG and see what they have to say about scale length on 8 strings. 25.5 is alright for a 7, but for an 8, not so much. Sure, you can compensate it with thicker strings, just like you could if you wanted to tune Octave E on a six string that wasn't baritone, but the bottom line is the 27" is more flexible. I've had a .059 on a 25.5 scale seven string and the B being dropped to A didn't sound good at all with the .059. So how would 25.5 scale be good for an 8 string if the F# and B were dropped to E and A? It would muddy up pretty bad. Sure, a .070 or .072 for the A and a .080 for the E would remedy it, but if you wanted to drop the notes further, youd lose the flexibility that the 27 would provide.
    Well, hello there. You a memeber? And my comment below, was not directed at you, but you were too fast with writing yours...
    gman128
    Jsteele1408 wrote: Have you ever played a 25.5" 8-string with the appropriate string gauges? The lowest string (and the one below it) are almost unplayable past the 7th fret, because the string gauge is so thick that it bounces off the frets. It's abhorrently uncomfortable to play, because in order to dodge fret buzz, you have to push down extremely hard on the string. As you know, pushing down that hard on a string will also bend the note. So, sure... there's no RULE saying you need a larger scale, but if you want an extended-range guitar that's comfortable to play all over the neck, and retains tension without sacrificing playability on the low strings... you're going to need an extended scale.
    So true, if you try to drop the low b on a 25.5 scale 7 string below Ab it often won't intonate properly, and fret buzz is almost a certainty with the thicker string that you NEED to hold a drop A or Ab tuning. Plus longer cales with thinner strings sound more articulate than shorter scales and thicker strings. Why do you think bands like Meshuggah use 29" scales on their 8 strings? Even them playing that low F sounds clear
    blackbird51
    When you have a longer scale length guitar, you have more tension out of your strings than normal 25.5" guitars, that's why your 10-59s feel good.
    shwilly
    Jsteele1408 wrote: Have you ever played a 25.5" 8-string with the appropriate string gauges? The lowest string (and the one below it) are almost unplayable past the 7th fret, because the string gauge is so thick that it bounces off the frets. It's abhorrently uncomfortable to play, because in order to dodge fret buzz, you have to push down extremely hard on the string. As you know, pushing down that hard on a string will also bend the note
    Not really: I've only toyed around with one of these (actually, I think it was a 25.5" Carvin) but I understand what you're on about -> I have been helping a friend set up some of his guitars with those Zakk Wylde strings (which are like .011 - .060's) and its a real b*tch to adjust the action without having 'em buzz like crazy Still, even though I've never been a fan of those uber thick "ship mast wire rope" strings in the first place I always opt for 7-strings with a 25.5 scale and bigger string gauge. Just a matter of preference, I really dont like guitars with bass-like necks. And Im pretty sure Im not the only one, otherwise they pbbly wouldnt make these guitars in the first place. If made properly there usually is a market for "untypical" instruments such as this one
    Ibeanez
    Carvin DC800. 27" scale, neck-through, locking tuners, made in USA. You choose options. If I was buying an 8, that's how I would go.