RG3EXFM1 review by Ibanez

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  • Sound: 9
  • Overall Impression: 9
  • Reliability & Durability: 9
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 10
  • Features: 10
  • Reviewer's score: 9.4 Superb
  • Users' score: 7.8 (64 votes)
Ibanez: RG3EXFM1
0

Price paid: $ 350

Purchased from: Guitar Center

Sound — 9
The sound is somewhat 'generic', as in it's repeated too much throughout music. The pickups are potentially too sensitive, because using on my Line-6 Spider IV 1.5 amp, the 'Clean' setting always sounds like the Drive knob on the guitar body is all the way up, whether it is or not. The best sound you can get out of this is Metal in a "Du Hast" style, or Insane in a "Blink-182" style.

Overall Impression — 9
Using for a rock/light-metal setting, this one is perfect for me, or anyone else in the same genre level. I've used this for a month, and is far better concerning my junior guitar. If this were lost or broken, it would definitely be worth replacing with the same model. Generally, there is no pickguard, but with a few modifications, one can be put in, as I would like to eventually do. The best feature is size - it's relatively small and light-weight, also to restate it's neck features, so it's very good for fast playing.

Reliability & Durability — 9
The guitar can withstand a lot of playing, with the only known downside being the toggle switch, because leaving it for a few weeks at 1 setting will cause it to become misaligned, which can be fixed by moving the switch back and forth slowly. The strap buttons are solid-angled, so the strap isn't meant to easily be removed (in this case, at all until it wares), so there can be some jumping force applied before there's any damage done. Finish is very well set, so it can take a few nicks before any real damage is done.

Action, Fit & Finish — 10
Guitar was flawless, the fret bars were all sanded so there's no catch on the bridge, the headstock was perfectly aline so that all strings go straight to the tuning knob without any turning point on the nut (excluding the downward angle), and all aspects of styling were very well set, with a very good outline running all the way around the guitar (body, neck, and headstock).

Features — 10
Came pretty basic, just the guitar and the strings as-is. Body style was flawless, natural wood-styling extending from directly down the middle of the body. 24-fret neck with Sharktooth inlays, including the 1st-Fret inlay. The neck itself was relatively thin for faster speed, including sliding and shredding. Came with 2 solid-texture pickups and a string-through-body bridge, also with a 5-way toggle switch.

2 comments sorted by best / new / date

    logicbdj
    It is interesting the number of guitar legends that don't use a whammy... Page, Angus Young, Johnny Winter... but I'm the same way... once you have one and get using it properly, it's hard not to play without one. You have to rethink your compositions and how the guitar will sound.
    rv_phoenix
    logicbdj wrote: It is interesting the number of guitar legends that don't use a whammy... Page, Angus Young, Johnny Winter... but I'm the same way... once you have one and get using it properly, it's hard not to play without one. You have to rethink your compositions and how the guitar will sound.
    You're absolutely right. There are ups and downs when using a tremolo, but if you use it properly, it can add flavour to your music. On the other hand, guitars with fixed bridge have a better pitch stability, strings are easier to remove (your guitar tech will owe you a lot, if you break strings during gigs), and most of them have also a better sustain. It costs very much to build a tremolo which doesn't affect tuning stability and sustain (it ca be done, however), and some players just wonder why paying a fortune for the 30 seconds you are using the bar while gigging. I myself have both types of guitars, each of them serving to a specific purpose.