RR24M review by Jackson

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  • Sound: 9
  • Overall Impression: 9
  • Reliability & Durability: 7
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 9
  • Features: 7
  • Reviewer's score: 8.2 Superb
  • Users' score: 7.8 (36 votes)
Jackson: RR24M
0

Price paid: € 850

Purchased from: thomann.de

Sound — 9
This guitar is targeted to play metal, and does its job very well! Sound is bright and powerful, distortion can be awesome if plugged into a good amplifier. I play mostly metal / metalcore, and for that, Jackson RR24M + Peavey Vypyr 30W = flawless match! For clean sound, it is good when it comes to metal. It is a powerful, deep tone. Obviously this guitar is extremely metal oriented, and you would like to get another guitar if you are an all-around player or you rarely play heavy music. However I am able to play blues stuff with this guitar, due to the reliability of the Peavey Vypyr amp! The sound is too powerful for genres such as blues, but I am not a blues enthusiast so I play it rarely: instead I usually play stuff like Bullet for my Valentine, and in this case I can obtain a sound which is almost the same as the original. Same thing for bands like Children of Bodom, Iron Maiden etc. The original Floyd Rose floating bridge allows to heavily use tremolo and bendings without losing tuning. This guitar can also be extremely silent, even with volume control turned at maximum level. Sometimes I forget to Switch off the amplifier since I can't hear any sound from it when I leave the guitar without playing. You are also able to play fast and well defined notes without background noise.

Overall Impression — 9
I love this guitar. I bought it because after my cheap Ibanez GIO I wanted a better guitar, metal-oriented, and Rhoads shape has always been attracting me. For what I play (metal / metalcore) it suits me great: 24 frets, EMG 81 active pickup, Floyd Rose floating bridge, low action, powerful and bright sound, lightweight, comfortable and good-looking. I have no regrets about my choice!

Reliability & Durability — 7
This is a straightforward guitar and I think it can withstand live playing without problems. I haven't had major problems after 5 months playing this guitar, but I noticed the fretboard bindings tend with time to lose their black finish which stains the bright-cloloured maple fretboard. However fortunately it seems that the bindings remain black without discoloring. I am very cautious with the body finish, I often clean it with a cotton cloth. It easily gets dirty due to fingerprints, being a good-looking shiny finish. In the same way, I think it can be scratched quite easily, but fortunately until now it didn't happen. Besides the above mentioned finish problems on the fretboard and body, I think the guitar hasn't got any other durability flaws.

Action, Fit & Finish — 9
Guitar arrived without noticeable problems, I am very satisfied about it. Action is very low, distance between strings and pickup is extremely low (about 1 mm) but strings don't touch it and there's no fret buzz. This means you are able to comfortably play very fast stuff! I feel the Rhoads style comfortable and I got used to it almost immediately. This guitar, thanks probably to the alder body, is lightweight. I noticed it comparing it to my Ibanez GIO guitar, noticeably heavier.

Features — 7
This guitar model was made in 2008. The one I own has got a "Made in Japan" label. This guitar is very similar to the RR24 model, except for the fretboard which is in maple (I guess this is the reason for the M in the model name), while the RR24 has got an ebony fretboard; maple fretboard is smoother than ebony one, and generally doesn't need to be maintained with lemon oil. RR24M and RR24, as their name suggests, are currently the only guitars in the Jackson Rhoads line to have 24 jumbo frets instead of only 22. The Rhoads-shaped body is made out of Alder; available colours are black with white bevels, or white with black bevels. The bridge is an original Floyd Rose. The guitar is equipped with a single active pickup, an EMG 81 in bridge position. There is also a single control, which is the pickup volume knob. Guitar came included with the Jackson V-shaped solid case.

18 comments sorted by best / new / date

    BlackDeath92
    Tremonti=god wrote: my friend has this guitar and he HATES it
    Why? The RR24 (either the ebony or maple neck) is a fantastic guitar! You're frien must have some serious taste issues.
    dale-banez
    maple fretboard is smoother than ebony one, and generally doesn't need to be maintained with lemon oil
    *facepalm*
    bustapr
    its pretty obvious that this isnt good for blues. I wouldnt pick this up, I play anything megadeth/metallica, and a guitar only 1 pickup and 1 knob(volume) wont suit my needs.
    SkepsisMetal
    Viotto wrote: I don't understand your facepalm: many maple necks have got finish over them, as far as I know lemon oil should'n be used on finished wood.
    Maple on it's own, isn't particularly smooth. And it's very soft, so it has a laquer finish over it for fretboards to save damage and chipping, which is what makes it smooth. Also makes it very slidy, and more difficult for playing legato phrases (I find, anyway). Ebony as a natural wood, is unfinished and just as smooth, but has more grip. Point is that lemon oil will erode the laquer coat and eventually your fretboard will be unusable.
    Viotto
    flippydude wrote: Jackson JS 32T Rhoads? that also has 24 frets.
    You are right, I didn't consider the JS (low level) Jackson series
    jeffmetalhead wrote: nice review
    Thank you And I forgot to write in review, this is a neck-through-body guitar.
    flippydude
    RR24M and RR24, as their name suggests, are currently the only guitars in the Jackson Rhoads line to have 24 jumbo frets instead of only 22.
    Jackson JS 32T Rhoads? that also has 24 frets.
    Good_Lord
    rog1234 wrote: I was about to get this, but I ended up buying Fender Jim Root Stratocaster, mainly for comfort, I love how RR's look, but I really hate playing on them.
    Rhoads aren't that bad to play sitted , just hold the guitar in classical position , the lower point between your legs and you're good to go . They are more comfortable than King V's
    rog1234
    I was about to get this, but I ended up buying Fender Jim Root Stratocaster, mainly for comfort, I love how RR's look, but I really hate playing on them.
    Viotto
    bustapr wrote: its pretty obvious that this isnt good for blues. I wouldnt pick this up, I play anything megadeth/metallica, and a guitar only 1 pickup and 1 knob(volume) wont suit my needs.
    This guitar is great for Metallica, I play Metallica sometimes and sound is excellent (plugging guitar to Peavey Vypyr 30W amplifier). @BlackDeath92 completely agree with you @dale-banez I don't understand your facepalm: many maple necks have got finish over them, as far as I know lemon oil should'n be used on finished wood.
    Amuro Jay
    If this was hardtail with a neck pickup, I'd consider it. I'm a sucker for maple necks. I wish my guitar had one.
    ThatFlyingThing
    SkepsisMetal wrote: Viotto wrote: I don't understand your facepalm: many maple necks have got finish over them, as far as I know lemon oil should'n be used on finished wood. Maple on it's own, isn't particularly smooth. And it's very soft, so it has a laquer finish over it for fretboards to save damage and chipping, which is what makes it smooth. Also makes it very slidy, and more difficult for playing legato phrases (I find, anyway). Ebony as a natural wood, is unfinished and just as smooth, but has more grip. Point is that lemon oil will erode the laquer coat and eventually your fretboard will be unusable.
    You just proved his point.
    wyldeshredder
    saved for an rr24 when i was thirteen. what a terrible waste that was lol. the metal playing 13 year old didn't last that long. trade+cash for an american strat after neglecting it for a few years, and then selling the strat after 5 months for a PRS. good ole HH tele filled the gap