Rockson JD-ST30 review by J&D

logo Ultimate Guitar
  • Sound: 6
  • Overall Impression: 8
  • Reliability & Durability: 7
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 4
  • Features: 7
  • Reviewer's score: 6.4 Neat
  • Users' score: 3.9 (13 votes)
J&D: Rockson JD-ST30
0

Price paid: € 66

Purchased from: Music-Store Cologne

Sound — 6
I play a lot of Alternative Rock, Punk and Metal but also some Ska and Britpop/rock, and I use the guitar mainly with my Fender Frontman 25R and a Zoom G2 preamp/modeler, but had also plenty of time to test it through an H&K TubeMeister. The original Pick-Ups are just awefull. The sound is ok but with the slightest bit of distortion and on band volume the feedback is just unbearable, so no chance for metal/punk with the original pickups. Despite that you get some strong mids but the high frequencies are a bit missing, sounds pretty dump for a Strat.

Overall Impression — 8
This was my first guitar and I've been playing now for 6 years. I've soon realized that the guitar wasn't fit for live playing the way it was, so I fixed the saddle position and built in some cheap ass humbucker pickup (which surprisingly hadn't any feedback at all) in bridge position. Now it is a guitar worth being played, the sound is aggressive and transparent which is exactly what I want. If it were stolen, I would probably hunt that guy down just to get it back, but I wouldn't buy it again. Emotional attachment and stuff. If you're able to fix the flaws, it is great guitar for people who don't really know if the electric guitar is the right instrument for them. And seriously, what do you expect for this price?!

Reliability & Durability — 7
If you want to play rock live or any other harder genre, forget about it. Like I said, the feedback from the pick-ups is just horrible. The hardware seems reliable, never had a problem with it. The tuners are unexpectedly good for this price, as well as the strap buttons.

Action, Fit & Finish — 4
The biggest flaw (despite the sh*tty pick-ups) was the saddle. It was impossible to tune the guitar right because the saddle was simply in the wrong place. I had to place it 2.5mm nearer to the first fret, now the guitar is in perfect tune. Aside from that, the factory set-up was not that good. But what can you do if your product is impossible to tune.

Features — 7
Built in 2005 in China, laminated alder body, thin c-shaped alder neck bolt-on, rosewood fretboard with 22 medium frets. One volume, two tone, 5-way selector, 3 no-name singlecoils, non-locking unbranded tuners, plastic saddle, standard tremolo. Pretty much the standard configuration for a cheapo Strat copy.

16 comments sorted by best / new / date

    jetwash69
    jinsu2301 wrote: it was basically like this: even if the guitar was on every single fret, from 1st to 22nd, on each string perfectly in tune, the open string was still too low. so I cut out some of the fretboard wood with a file and placed the saddle nearer to the 1st fret, decreasing the scale by a few milimeters and correcting the pitch of the open strings. i think such a production defect goes beyond the term "crappy setup"... hope this helps to understand what the problem was
    :confused: Now I'm more confused. The only saddles I know of on a Strat are on the bridge, which is pretty much independent of the fretboard. You can adjust them nearer for farther from the fretboard with the intonation adjusters. I don't see how cutting wood off the fretboard has anything to do with scale length. You're talking rosewood fretboard, right? That piece of wood is glued to the neck. Unless you cut wood off the heel of the neck and re-drill the screw holes so that the nut ends up closer to the bridge, then I don't see how what you did would change the scale length. Or when you say "saddle" do you really mean "nut"? That's the term for the piece of plastic with slots holding the strings at the end of the fretboard (between the first fret and the headstock). If you moved the nut away from the headstock by expanding the slot toward the first fret, then I'd be curious how well the nut sits in there without enough wood to hold it in? "But what can you do if your product is impossible to tune?" You can intonate it by adjusting the actual saddles (note plural, not singular, for there are 6 saddles, not 1) with the screws sticking out the back of the bridge. You don't move the nut. Am I still not understanding what you did? We are talking about a electric solid body guitar in the style of a Fender Stratocaster, with 6 steel strings and tremolo bridge, right? I don't intend to condescend; I'm genuinely scratching my head over this and kind of wondering if you aren't trolling? Sounds like we've both been playing guitar about the same amount of time...
    james4
    ^ because changing the position of the saddle at the bridge might make the open string in tune, but if the distance from the first fret to the nut is too far, then every fretted note would be sharp
    Air_Stryker
    Finally a realistic review on a cheap guitar, not straight tens just 'cause it's someone's first. To be frankly honest, 6.4 doesn't sound too bad for just 66. Shame about the feedback though, could whack some nicer pickups in there and you'd have a reasonable guitar =) As for the saddle problem, I've owned two unheard of strat copy guitars, and they both had similar problems.
    jetwash69
    "Saddle was in the wrong place" Does this mean the guitar needed intonation? That's just part of a crappy setup if that's what you mean. And I don't know what else it could mean.
    jinsu2301
    jetwash69 wrote: Does this mean the guitar needed intonation? That's just part of a crappy setup if that's what you mean. And I don't know what else it could mean.
    it was basically like this: even if the guitar was on every single fret, from 1st to 22nd, on each string perfectly in tune, the open string was still too low. so I cut out some of the fretboard wood with a file and placed the saddle nearer to the 1st fret, decreasing the scale by a few milimeters and correcting the pitch of the open strings. i think such a production defect goes beyond the term "crappy setup"... hope this helps to understand what the problem was
    jinsu2301
    jetwash69 wrote: Or when you say "saddle" do you really mean "nut"?
    sorry, my mistake T_T i mean the nut, of course. it's the "Sattel" in german, which literally means "saddle", sorry.
    then I'd be curious how well the nut sits in there without enough wood to hold it in?
    i have to keep it in place with a thin piece of wood once again sorry for the confusion.
    jetwash69
    No problem, but still wondering why you didn't just intonate the guitar with the actual saddles in the bridge?
    parhelia_0000
    So basically, we can consider this as a lower-end Fender Stratocaster copy, then. Myself, I think this would be a good guitar for beginners, but for professionals, it'd be a bit of a turn-off.
    jetwash69
    james4 wrote: ^ because changing the position of the saddle at the bridge might make the open string in tune, but if the distance from the first fret to the nut is too far, then every fretted note would be sharp
    Well, if that's the case, then it sounds like a major factory defect and if you bought it new, then any store should exchange it and send it back to the manufacturer. If you bought it used, then so much for caveat emptor. Still, an enlarged nut slot is not a good thing. Ought to replace the neck if you're going to do anything serious with it. That defect would not be good for beginners at all unless they need experience returning stuff to the store.
    sstony
    These J & D guitars are the worst Ive ever seen, a friend of my son brought his over so I could set it up, I did my best but that thing was just a piece of shiiit. Plugged it into my Mesa Mark V to check the sound of the pickups and all it did was hurt your ears. These guitars I wouldnt recommend even for a beginner.
    snowballs171
    hey i have one of these strats, love it, awesome guitar for projects. i need to say the only thing i have stock are the body and the neck. new pups wilkinson hot single coils and humbucker hot wound (hss) , wilkinson WVP6CR (Steal block version), changed all the electronics and it sounds nice to me, better then "most" squier´s (exept the classic vibes) .iIf you want check it out, i have some vids of it with a bugera v5 on my channel:
    scepa
    i got mine 15 days ago.first day i went back to the shop couse strings made a noise from hiting the bars.they loose a neck a bit,and now it's ok,but still a little stiff.when i wear down current strings i'm going back for a free setup.it sounds good for a cheap guitar,and with a better pickups it will be solid peace of an instrument.now it' 5.5 and it can be upgradet to a 7.like it all and all