Stealth C-7 review by Schecter

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  • Features: 8
  • Sound: 6
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 7
  • Reliability & Durability: 7
  • Overall Impression: 7
  • Reviewer's score: 7 Good
  • Users' score: 8 (1 vote)
Schecter: Stealth C-7
1

Price paid: £ 500

Purchased from: Andertons

Features — 8
This 7 string guitar was made in South Korea, it's got a rosewood fretboard with 24 frets and a body made of mahogany with a matte black finish. The bridge is a
Schecter Custom Hardtail with string thru body and it features the standard volume/tone knobs and pickup selectors you'd expect a guitar to have. The tone knob, however, can be pulled upwards so the Schecter Diamond SuperRock-II pickups go in to single coil mode. I don't see the point, but it's nice to have additional options.

The neck is quite thin, I think that makes it more comfortable to play but people with different sized hands might not.

Sound — 6
The SuperRock II pickups are pretty poor for the price and somewhat misleadingly named because I don't think they are particularly good at rock, or metal or most things. In fact, they only thing they are truly good at is cleans. Bright, reverb-laden 90s cleans for example are one of the things this guitar is pretty good at, which makes 0 sense for a 7 string guitar.

The biggest problem with the pickups is that they sound a bit thin and weak and are lacking a some punch in the lower frequencies. I've run this through a Jet City 100HDM, Marshall DSL100 and a Bugera 6260 Infinium and it's always sounded poor in comparison to much cheaper 6 string guitars.

Anyway, you can get some alright rock and metal tones from this guitar, but it definitely needs new pickups if you want it to sound truly good.

Action, Fit & Finish — 7
The guitar was quite well set up when it arrived, the pickups were a good height and the action was fine. I promptly messed everything up in order to put some thicker strings on. It's harder to get a good set up with thicker strings, but that's not really surprising.

The bridge pickups weren't smooth when it arrived - there were some scuffs on the edges, so it didn't come in the expected immaculate condition. Maybe I could have kicked up a fuss and got it replaced but I don't care about bridge pickups. Who even does?

Reliability & Durability — 7
I've only had this guitar for perhaps a year and a half but those pesky bridge pickups are already messed up. They stopped working just a few months after I got it for no apparent reason. Luckily I never use them, so I've made no effort to even check out the problem.

Apart from that I've had no issues with the guitar, it's survived a few knocks without picking up any marks and the important pickups work just fine. I play it regularly and there's no fret wear or anything, so I'd say it's reasonably solid.

Overall Impression — 7
My overall impression is that this is a solid guitar let down by disappointing pickups. There are almost certainly better sounding options available in this price range, whether new or second hand.

However, I feel that with better pickups this could prove to be a good instrument and a well-respected member of anyone's guitar arsenal. Certainly I myself am prepared to keep hold of it with a view to one day ridding it of the Not-So-SuperRock IIs that are holding it back from it's true potential.

3 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Ippon
    Sweet guitar. It would've been sweeter with a 26.5" scale, aside from the blah PUs.   
    JackSaints
    Swapped the bridge pickup for a Seymour Duncan SH-6B. It sounds a lot better but there's still a distinct lack of low end.