Affinity Telecaster review by Squier

logo Ultimate Guitar
  • Sound: 8
  • Overall Impression: 7
  • Reliability & Durability: 7
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 7
  • Features: 7
  • Reviewer's score: 7.2 Good
  • Users' score: 7.9 (232 votes)
Squier: Affinity Telecaster
1

Price paid: $ 153

Purchased from: Guitar Center

Sound — 8
My musical styles are all over the map. I usually play through a Behringer acoustic amp and a Fender Frontman. It's noisy, but they are single coil pickups. Not a really loud or powerful guitar, as the pickups don't hae a lot of punch. The sound is full and definitely Tele. Volume does not compare to my other electrics (Les Paul, Ibanez Artcore, Strat, Ovation UK II).

Overall Impression — 7
This is a great value for the money. It plays well, stays in tune, and once adjusted has been very stable. The neck is very comfortable and it holds tune well even under furious string bends. This would be a great beginner's guitar, as well as a good one if you want the Tele sound but don't want to spend a lot. I have considered replacing the pickups, but as of yet have not.

Reliability & Durability — 7
I use this guitar mostly for our little church praise band. Not very rigorous playing. I probably would not use it for hard gigging. I use it because it plays well, is cheap, and easy to haul around and I don't have to really worry about it. The Les Paul and the Strat stay at home.

Action, Fit & Finish — 7
I got a bit off the guitar because it had a couple of dings in it. Otherwise, very nice finish, nice look. Pickups were way low and I raised the bridge pickup. I had to do some tweaking to get the action where I wanted. The neck needed adjustment and as I said, a heavier gauge string was put on, and that helped a lot. The three position switch is pretty cheap, and has to be handled carefully.

Features — 7
I am guessing this was made around 2010. This is the butterscotch model. Basic Fender Tele configuration. It came with really light strings (.008 I believe)which I changed to a light top heavy bottom. All of the volume and tone and selectors are basic Tele style. Nothing fancy. The guitar included no accessories and I got about 15 bucks off because it was missing the selector knob (I got one at another store for about 2.00).

14 comments sorted by best / new / date

    MaggaraMarine
    wendee27 wrote: gibsons and epiphones and all other brands s*ck! fender can get the gibson tone but not vice versa. even the better made squiers beat the expensive gibsons. pull down the tone knob of a tele or a strat and you instantly get the humbucker tone (dont think too deep, its common sense), but gibsons can never sound bright. they're just simply lame. L-A-M-E. give a strat a little gain and it will blowwwww your brains right away but with les paul, argh.. i love the trashy feel of the tones of teles and strats. les pauls are too play safe, too clean, too choreographed!
    Fender fanboy? You don't need to hate Gibson to show that you like Fender guitars. In fact, the only two guitars that a guitarist needs are Fender Stratocaster and Gibson Les Paul. And if you can't find a difference in tone between a Gibson Les Paul and Fender Strat you are pretty much a tone deaf. I mean that Strat doesn't give you an LP tone, nor does LP give you a Strat tone. That's because Strats have Single coils and Les Pauls have humbuckers. Of course it's a matter of taste which guitar you prefer but I'm telling you that this kind of comments just make you look stupid.
    rv_phoenix
    austinm82 wrote: This really isn't a bad guitar. I have one that I bought in high school...it was probably made around 2002. The finish chiped off real easy, so I just sanded it all off and clear coated it. I put a SD Hotrails in the bridge with a coil tap, and squeezed an old strat pickup in the neck, and now its pretty nice.
    Yeah, but you've paid the guitar twice: once when you first bought it, and twice when you upgraded it. For this price (2xSquier Affinity), you could actually buy a real guitar. I'm not an arrogant bastard who only speaks Fender and Gibson slang. But the good Squiers (remarkably good, dear I say) are in the upper range: it's the Classic Vibe Series, not the Affinity. And it's not a cheap guitar anymore. For the price of a Classic Vibe, you already have a much wider choice of excellent Strat and Tele-style guitars. Check at Vintage or Hodson, for instance.
    BellaMosse
    yesterday I came through a great video on guitar strings oscillation.Mind blowing video. vitamin D
    Air_Stryker
    rv_phoenix wrote: this_goes_to_11 wrote: what exactly is wrong with buying guitars online? As long as you try it in a store before hand there's nothing wrong with it. I have a suspicion you just needed another an innane point in your argument against a review written by a person who is new to the guitar world. "Good lord!" it must be difficult to type and play guitar with your head so far up your ass. Douchebag. Dear fellow, there are no two identical guitars in the world. Because wood, which gives resonance, tone and sustain, is different even if you cut the pieces from the same tree. You can check a guitar in a music shop, but ordering the same model online doesn't mean you'll get the same guitar. Just the same model. Not to mention Chinese-made guitars, provided with pups with different outputs, impedances etc. Two of such guitars, from the same batch and assembled by the same person, could sound very different one from another. Once again: a real player never buys guitars online. If your ears don't notice these differences between guitars, then you're not a musician. Just an amateur. No offence. But amateurs shouldn't write reviews. Reviews are supposed to advice people. How to advice people, when you need advice yourself? (P.S. Insulting people doesn't raise anyone's IQ.)
    As though your ears make a difference as to whether you're a professional or an amateur. I have damaged hearing so I'm an amateur? I still play as best as I f--king can. Beethoven was deaf. Was he an amateur? Don't be so pretentious, and don't put people down every step they take. UG gives users the option to write their own reviews, surprisingly, not every user on this site is a virtuoso, not all of them are "professional" either. It doesn't make their opinions absolutely invalid. And not all of us live in a place where it is practical to walk out of our house to the local music shop. Some of us don't HAVE a local music shop, some of us do have to order from the internet, but you can't instantly decide everyone who does so is an amateur, and you also won't find every guitar in the world in a music shop. So you're saying that if my local store doesn't do that LTD EC401 I want so much, I should give up with it and pick something else? And finally, don't go giving other people grief on advice when your grammar and syntax is so abysmal "Reviews are supposed to advice people. How to advice people, when you need advice yourself?"
    shoule79
    Kingnichendrix : "ok these stupid snob comments about "ohh i wouldnt pay that much for a squier" as a matter of fact, Will the lead guitarist in a band called perfect chemistry has a gibson les paul classic the rhythm guitarist in his band bought a squier for 80 brittish pound Will was soo annoyed to find out that the squier sounded and felt better than his les paul which i might add cost him 1800 brittish pound" I'll ship anyone anywhere any Squire for a Gibson Les Paul Classic in trade. Something tells me i'm not going to get any bites on that.
    shoule79
    wendee27 : "gibsons and epiphones and all other brands s*ck! fender can get the gibson tone but not vice versa. even the better made squiers beat the expensive gibsons. pull down the tone knob of a tele or a strat and you instantly get the humbucker tone (dont think too deep, its common sense), but gibsons can never sound bright. they're just simply lame. L-A-M-E. give a strat a little gain and it will blowwwww your brains right away but with les paul, argh.. i love the trashy feel of the tones of teles and strats. les pauls are too play safe, too clean, too choreographed!" I've owned 6 or 7 Fenders over the years, from American, to Japanese and even some MIM. You cannot get a Gibson sound out of them unless you swap out the PUPs and route the body. Even then, the scale still does not sound like a Gibson due to the scale length (Fenders have more snap). I have a 70's Tele Deluxe (2 buckers, les paul control setup) and it sounds absolutely nothing like my 70's Paul (which is a good thing). However, I have a 67 Melody Maker SG with 2 single coil PUPs that sounds almost identical to a Mustang (one of the Fenders I used to own, similar output PUPs, same scale length) and have heard some Marauders that do a decent Tele custom imitation. I still wouldn't say that they sound the exactly the same though(the SG was brighter). IMHO, when you find a good Fender, they are godly, but there are just some styles that I wouldn't play with them (jazz, metal). Overall, I find that Gibson's (older ones anyways) are a tad more consistent if you are looking for a particular brands 'sound'. I've hit the stage with both over the years, and if I had to play with one brand only, i'd probably take the Gibson. My $0.02.
    rv_phoenix
    You're absolutely right about everything you say. Still, as you've already said, it's a matter of personal choice and, of course, a matter of style. Right now, for instance, I'm somehow cut in the middle, between two of my Fender-style Yamahas and an LP-style Vintage V-100. For a long time I've been a Stratophile, because of doing much prog and covering a lot of Pink Floyd. But now, I started looking for something else, with more guts: Les Paul seemed an inevitable option. (You understood that I can't afford Gibsons or Fenders right now, although I've owned a Fender Stratocaster American Special some 20 years ago. But we are talking about types of guitars, not necessarily makes.) There is no such thing as an universal guitar. Gibsons, despite being wonderful instruments, have limitations too, because of company's apparent incapacity of developping single coils. If you play more reffined music - like Pink Floyd -, it's hard to do it with a Gibson, as it is trully difficult to play jazz on a Strat. (I wouldn't be so rough about metal: a lot of metal gods, from Iron Maiden to Yngwie Malmsteen, massively use Strats, modified versions, certainly, to deliver us impressive riffs.) For such explanations, as those posted by shoule79 , UG remains an useful resource for guitar players, no matter how many ill-educated persons interfere. Thank you for intervening, shoule79 !
    MaggaraMarine
    rv_phoenix wrote: (I wouldn't be so rough about metal: a lot of metal gods, from Iron Maiden to Yngwie Malmsteen, massively use Strats, modified versions, certainly, to deliver us impressive riffs.)
    I think when people talk about metal today they mean new metal, not 80s metal. They have different sounds. Nowadays people just want that massive guitar wall over produced sound. In the 80s the sounds were more raw and not that big. (I prefer the 80s sound.) So you're right about that Maiden stuff but I can't see any of the new bands using Strats.
    rv_phoenix
    MaggaraMarine wrote: I think when people talk about metal today they mean new metal, not 80s metal. They have different sounds. Nowadays people just want that massive guitar wall over produced sound. In the 80s the sounds were more raw and not that big. (I prefer the 80s sound.) So you're right about that Maiden stuff but I can't see any of the new bands using Strats.
    You are absolutely right about metal of the 80s vs. contemporary metal. But, in my post, there's a slight hint, when I speak about modified versons of a Stratocaster: replacing Strat's original pickups by three of Seymour Duncan's Hot Rails, you get the hell of a sound! I don't think Strat's wood or shape are prohibiting the metal sound, so it's quite easy to get what you want from this extremely versatile guitar. As you know, most of contemporary metal guitars are made in Alder (such as the Strat), and a good deal of them are the so-called SuperStrats. Invented in the 80s, still very fashionable nowadays. Anyway, this doesn't change what shoule79 has said: Strats are the best when used for Classic Rock, Blues and Prog. If you play other music, get other guitars. Gibson's stable might offer you the right thing.
    epiphonejack
    hi everybody i really need help with my new squire telecaster!i was sat on my bed playing the other day and heard a sharp snap later to find out that the amp lead insert is surrounded by a small black plastic surrounding and had snapped around leaving the head part hanging out of the hole! i really need help where to buy a new part for it. my email address is myerscough.jack064@gmail.com if anyone has suggestions or same problems.
    rv_phoenix
    this_goes_to_11 wrote: what exactly is wrong with buying guitars online? As long as you try it in a store before hand there's nothing wrong with it. I have a suspicion you just needed another an innane point in your argument against a review written by a person who is new to the guitar world. "Good lord!" it must be difficult to type and play guitar with your head so far up your ass. Douchebag.
    Dear fellow, there are no two identical guitars in the world. Because wood, which gives resonance, tone and sustain, is different even if you cut the pieces from the same tree. You can check a guitar in a music shop, but ordering the same model online doesn't mean you'll get the same guitar . Just the same model . Not to mention Chinese-made guitars, provided with pups with different outputs, impedances etc. Two of such guitars, from the same batch and assembled by the same person, could sound very different one from another. Once again: a real player never buys guitars online. If your ears don't notice these differences between guitars, then you're not a musician. Just an amateur. No offence. But amateurs shouldn't write reviews. Reviews are supposed to advice people. How to advice people, when you need advice yourself? (P.S. Insulting people doesn't raise anyone's IQ.)
    rv_phoenix
    My friend, although you seem to live in a place without a music shop (or without LTDs in the actual music shop), you also live in a happy world, where English is the only language and only English native-speaking people are allowed to live. I'd like to read your lines written in my native language: I bet I'd have a good laugh. And yes, someone who can't tell the difference between the sound of two guitars is an amateur. There's nothing bad being an amateur: you can always improve, and actually quit being an amateur, by learning. And learning begins with listening to more experienced people. The fact that Beethoven was (became is a more appropriate word, IMHO) deaf doesn't change the circumstances of our discussion: Beethoven was a composer,not a player. He was supposed to hear (in his head) the music , not the instrument . There's nothing bad living in a town without a music shop, neither. But a musician would make a trip to a town with a music shop, in order to buy his instrument. If I'd need an LTD EC401 and I didn't find it locally, I would go to an LTD representative sho, no matter how far. Players use to make sacrifices for art, you know? I also didn't deny - how could I possibly do that? - the right of anyone to write anything he wants. Here, at the UG, it seems to be the rule, unfortunately, that every 12 years old teenager who puts his hands on a guitar for the first time make reviews and reccomands stuff to other people. The least we can do is tell these people they're simply wrong. Buying instruments online, for instance, is wrong. You'll never receive (maybe only by blind fortune) your guitar, but the guitar selected by the vendor's computer. Those who care about their sound and style are very sensitive at these aspects. It's also a problem for beginners, especially living in towns without music shops: 75%, if not 90% of the guitars purchased online come with a defective setup. How can the beginner fix this problem? Don't rush to judge peple until you have a broader picture of the whole problem.