WV66GT review by Washburn

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  • Sound: 10
  • Overall Impression: 10
  • Reliability & Durability: 9
  • Action, Fit & Finish: 8
  • Features: 9
  • Reviewer's score: 9.2 Superb
  • Users' score: 4.8 (18 votes)
Washburn: WV66GT
0

Price paid: £ 320

Purchased from: GAK.co.uk

Sound — 10
I play black metal, thrash metal, prog metal, hard rock, but mainly melodic death metal, and this guitar does all that and more. I heard a lot about how great the EMG 81 is, and I had high expectations about how it would sound, and it STILL blew me away. Due to it only having one pickup and one volume, I expected it to be good for metal and nothing else, but when I turned off my distortion, I got an amazing clean tone, perfect for stuff like Metallica and Mudvayne (big shock). But where it really shines is with the distortion cranked to 11. Near infinite sustain, screaming harmonics, and crushing tone. Messing with my EQ and pedals, I can make this Beast replicate sounds from famous bands. A few examples of what this can replicate: Carcass, Arch Enemy, Amon Amarth, Metallica, Ozzy Osbourne, and many similar sounds.

Overall Impression — 10
I've been playing for almost 4 years, and I own 2 Ibanez guitars other than this. This puts Ibanez to shame. The only thing I don't like about it is that it only has 22 frets, not 24. If this were lost or stolen, I would probably cry, as it took a lot of time and effort to get it delivered, since I ordered it christmas time (took a month to get delivered). After I stopped crying, I would buy another one of these immediately.

Reliability & Durability — 9
This thing is built like a tank. Its got a buit of heft to it, but you get used to that quite quickly. The only problem with it is that the satin finish will rub after a while and become shiny in spots. The hardware should have to problems, and I can't see it breaking or chipping in the near future. The strap buttons though are less than desirable. For the price, they'redecent, but I'm investing in strap locks soon just in case

Action, Fit & Finish — 8
Ahh yes, the achiles heel of the guitar. Everything about this guitar is amazing...except for the tuners. They go out of tune really easily, and since I use heavy strings for extreme low tunings, they even go out of tune while playing. However, after I tuned the strings back up to standard, then back down, the problem seems to be solved.

Features — 9
Flying V Mahogany body and set mahogany neck Ebony fretboard with 22 frets and no inlays Satin Black finish with creme binding on body, neck, and headstock Hardtail bridge Non-locking Grover 18:1 tuners Single EMG 81 active pickup 1 volume A really basic, solid built guitar for metal. Came with gigbag, cheap cable, and hex key for adjusting truss rod

26 comments sorted by best / new / date

    rokkit
    rv_phoenix wrote: rhythmkillingMo wrote: @ rv_pheonix - I really liked this review, shame it got gangbanged by "someone" who cant take someones word for it.... Ive played this guitar and i think its an acurate rating, as its not rated against some USA made $6000 guitar, its rated on itself. Tone doesnt come from tone knobs, it comes from the pickup, the player, and the wood. Also remember, These are user ratings, meaning its their preference. If you would like a better review, do it yourself or pay for someone to do it. All you say goes very well against your comment. I've never complained about rating the Washburn aside or against the 6000 $ guitars. If you don't know what the word "scale" means, I've only reffered to the Gibson vs Fender scale, that is lenght from the middle of the nut to the saddles: people who know something about guitars understand it's just a technical refference, not a value one. Gibson and Fender scales are to be found on 99% of the guitars on the planet, from 5o$ to 50.000 $; only a few makes, like Danelectro, Guvnor or Fret-King use a 25' scale (so-called "Danelectro scale"). In fact, I was just trying to explain to rokkit, ina polite way, that his wish is stupid and a nonsense in his own review: a guitar with a Gibson scale, like his Washburn, COULD NEVER have 24 frets. A real guitar player would know that and would have never expressed it, for obvious resons. In case you don't know to read, my comment expressed the same judgement about rokkit's review, mostly positive ("Washburn is certainly a good guitar and a solid brand."). All in all, rokkit's review wasn't bad. But a 10 for the sound of a guitar with 1 pickup is just too much. And that's because the sound comes from pickup(s) too. Don't tell me about wood: my reviews and comments show up how much I know (or I don't know) about wood. An electric guitar is something able to "translate" a vibration into an electric signal. The device who does this "translation" job is caled a pickup. So sound depends very much on pickups (not exclusively, but very much), and a 2 or 3 pickups guitar will always have a much larger variety of sounds than a guitar with 1 (one) pickup. No matter how good or bad is the player, how thick and resonant is the wood etc. This is obvious for everyone who has touched a guitar at least once. Pretending something else, just to support a review that rated a 10 a guitar with one single pickup, isn't something you can be proud of. All the rest ("gangbanging") is just words and worth nothing. To rokkit: your Stagg comments show quite clearly that you are amazed by firewood. Owning a Washburn improves your image very much... but pay attention to unwanted remarks which show up very clearly your lack of experience and musical sense. Once again: your review is basicly good, only a few remarks and ratings aren't accurate. When you'll accumulate more experience, you'll know why. This Washburn, as any Washburn, is good and trustful, but a 9,2 is way too much. Be intelligent and compare it to the users ratings.
    1 pickup. its built for metal, not church music. the 1 pickup works. go away troll
    rokkit
    rv_phoenix wrote: rhythmkillingMo wrote: @ rv_pheonix - I really liked this review, shame it got gangbanged by "someone" who cant take someones word for it.... Ive played this guitar and i think its an acurate rating, as its not rated against some USA made $6000 guitar, its rated on itself. Tone doesnt come from tone knobs, it comes from the pickup, the player, and the wood. Also remember, These are user ratings, meaning its their preference. If you would like a better review, do it yourself or pay for someone to do it. All you say goes very well against your comment. I've never complained about rating the Washburn aside or against the 6000 $ guitars. If you don't know what the word "scale" means, I've only reffered to the Gibson vs Fender scale, that is lenght from the middle of the nut to the saddles: people who know something about guitars understand it's just a technical refference, not a value one. Gibson and Fender scales are to be found on 99% of the guitars on the planet, from 5o$ to 50.000 $; only a few makes, like Danelectro, Guvnor or Fret-King use a 25' scale (so-called "Danelectro scale"). In fact, I was just trying to explain to rokkit, ina polite way, that his wish is stupid and a nonsense in his own review: a guitar with a Gibson scale, like his Washburn, COULD NEVER have 24 frets. A real guitar player would know that and would have never expressed it, for obvious resons. In case you don't know to read, my comment expressed the same judgement about rokkit's review, mostly positive ("Washburn is certainly a good guitar and a solid brand."). All in all, rokkit's review wasn't bad. But a 10 for the sound of a guitar with 1 pickup is just too much. And that's because the sound comes from pickup(s) too. Don't tell me about wood: my reviews and comments show up how much I know (or I don't know) about wood. An electric guitar is something able to "translate" a vibration into an electric signal. The device who does this "translation" job is caled a pickup. So sound depends very much on pickups (not exclusively, but very much), and a 2 or 3 pickups guitar will always have a much larger variety of sounds than a guitar with 1 (one) pickup. No matter how good or bad is the player, how thick and resonant is the wood etc. This is obvious for everyone who has touched a guitar at least once. Pretending something else, just to support a review that rated a 10 a guitar with one single pickup, isn't something you can be proud of. All the rest ("gangbanging") is just words and worth nothing. To rokkit: your Stagg comments show quite clearly that you are amazed by firewood. Owning a Washburn improves your image very much... but pay attention to unwanted remarks which show up very clearly your lack of experience and musical sense. Once again: your review is basicly good, only a few remarks and ratings aren't accurate. When you'll accumulate more experience, you'll know why. This Washburn, as any Washburn, is good and trustful, but a 9,2 is way too much. Be intelligent and compare it to the users ratings.
    btw, i own an ibanez with the same scale. guess what? 24 frets
    rv_phoenix
    Washburn is certainly a good guitar and a solid brand. But 10 for sound, for a guitar with only one pickup? After you granted only a 9 for (otherwise impressive) features, like something's missing up there? (And it really is: a second pickup!) How much would you rate a Music Man with 4 pickups and 21 combinations, then? A 38? And why do you think a 22 fret guitar is not enough? Are you such a great guitar player that you ran out of notes? Don't you know that Washburn is a serious brand, not a Chinese one, hence it doesn't alter an original design? Gibson's Flying V, which has generated a wave of emulation that includes your guitar, has only 22 frets. If you weren't so unexperienced in guitars, you could probably measure the guitar's scale: it's 628 mm, the original Gibson scale. On such a short scale, it's impossible to squeeze 24 frets. And nobody has ever seen a Flying V-type guitar with a Fender scale (that is 648 mm), the only one which can actually host 24 frets... I don't mention Staggs and other Chinese makeshifts that you tend to favor over serious brands. Believe me, dear fellow, you don't need 24 frets anyway. You can barely stammer something on 22!
    Ibanezbass4life
    Seems like a good riffing guitar, but nothing more. I'd use it only if i was not going to play any solos. If you want an all-round good guitar, get a Dean Dave Mustaine signature V. AMAZING guitar, 24 frets and 2 humbuckers. I'd recommend that.
    rv_phoenix
    Really, which Ibanez? Just wondering, since Ibanez uses on all metal axes the Fender scale... 24 frets, but 648 mm. (Let me tell you a tip: there is even a guitar with 25 frets!) And, dear rokkit, I never had a doubt you play metal: your manners speak very clearly that. But I'm not quite sure you actually play. A player doesn't think this way and, most of all, doesn't buy guitars online. I think you produce a sort of a noise some of your pals, by politeness, call "metal". (What do you mean by church music? In my country, the only music used in church is vocal. Here we talk about guitars. Or at least we pretend to, like some of the fellows - or it's just one? - above...)
    rv_phoenix
    Btw, this is an expensive guitar. It's a Signature Model, "GT" coming from "Greg Tribett". Rokkit bought it on a generous discount, but its catalogue price (check Washburn's site) is 1329 USD. Which is about the price of a Gibson Les Paul Standard, of a PRS Custom 24, and almost the double of a basic Fender Stratocaster. At this price, let me tell you the features are very scarce... You really pay for the fancy name, otherwise, the only thing you can do with the axe is bang your neighbours' ears... or play metal in a pro band (not ther case of our fellows above). This guitar doesn't even have a tone control, so its sound area is very very narrow.
    rv_phoenix
    rhythmkillingMo wrote: @ rv_pheonix - I really liked this review, shame it got gangbanged by "someone" who cant take someones word for it.... Ive played this guitar and i think its an acurate rating, as its not rated against some USA made $6000 guitar, its rated on itself. Tone doesnt come from tone knobs, it comes from the pickup, the player, and the wood. Also remember, These are user ratings, meaning its their preference. If you would like a better review, do it yourself or pay for someone to do it.
    All you say goes very well against your comment. I've never complained about rating the Washburn aside or against the 6000 $ guitars. If you don't know what the word "scale" means, I've only reffered to the Gibson vs Fender scale, that is lenght from the middle of the nut to the saddles: people who know something about guitars understand it's just a technical refference, not a value one. Gibson and Fender scales are to be found on 99% of the guitars on the planet, from 5o$ to 50.000 $; only a few makes, like Danelectro, Guvnor or Fret-King use a 25' scale (so-called "Danelectro scale"). In fact, I was just trying to explain to rokkit, ina polite way, that his wish is stupid and a nonsense in his own review: a guitar with a Gibson scale, like his Washburn, COULD NEVER have 24 frets. A real guitar player would know that and would have never expressed it, for obvious resons. In case you don't know to read, my comment expressed the same judgement about rokkit's review, mostly positive ("Washburn is certainly a good guitar and a solid brand."). All in all, rokkit's review wasn't bad. But a 10 for the sound of a guitar with 1 pickup is just too much. And that's because the sound comes from pickup(s) too. Don't tell me about wood: my reviews and comments show up how much I know (or I don't know) about wood. An electric guitar is something able to "translate" a vibration into an electric signal. The device who does this "translation" job is caled a pickup. So sound depends very much on pickups (not exclusively, but very much), and a 2 or 3 pickups guitar will always have a much larger variety of sounds than a guitar with 1 (one) pickup. No matter how good or bad is the player, how thick and resonant is the wood etc. This is obvious for everyone who has touched a guitar at least once. Pretending something else, just to support a review that rated a 10 a guitar with one single pickup, isn't something you can be proud of. All the rest ("gangbanging") is just words and worth nothing. To rokkit: your Stagg comments show quite clearly that you are amazed by firewood. Owning a Washburn improves your image very much... but pay attention to unwanted remarks which show up very clearly your lack of experience and musical sense. Once again: your review is basicly good, only a few remarks and ratings aren't accurate. When you'll accumulate more experience, you'll know why. This Washburn, as any Washburn, is good and trustful, but a 9,2 is way too much. Be intelligent and compare it to the users ratings.
    franzehoff
    Wow... You all should pull your proverbial asses out of your heads. Leave your personal preferences and stick to the point - A REVIEW OF A GUITAR. Stick to the facts about THAT guitar. There will always be someone who likes this or that guitar for this or that reason. I have been playing a lounge time and have played so many guitars and you could not give me an Ibanez to keep. I just do not like the way they feel. I love the 24.5" 22 fret scale and I can shred that to hell and back. That's what feels right tot ME. Get over yourselves and have a little common courtesy and civility. You only show your own childishness by call names and ridiculing people based on your own bias. A decent review of a guitar that I camcacross and am not going to attempt to score! I will grab a dermal and bastardize it in unholy ways, but that because I enjoy that kind of stuff. As for Tone knobs... I almost never use them. To my ears, they suck the life out of a guitar. If I want a certain sound I use a certain guitar; my start for more bluesy/earthy stuff, one of my many Washburns (which, again, to me, smoke any Gibson or the like) for Rock/Hard Rock/Metal and one of my home creations for different soloing applications. A Tone knob IS NOT needed to create versatility in a guitar - some simple eq'ing via a pedal or the amp will allow almost infinite tonal varieties; pedals are also a LOT easier to use on the fly. So, grab your axe of choice and have fun and put your ego in the garbage can on the way out. We are all lovers of these amazing instruments... share that love... PEACE!
    balisain
    My friend has this guitar and it is a wonderful metal machine. Also, I believe that particular category clearly reads 'SOUND' and not 'NUMBER OF PICKUPS'. Might just want to think about that.
    MaggaraMarine
    lordcowman wrote: Wow people scale length REALLY DOES affect the guitar in many ways. The shorter length you go, the slinkier it gets for bending strings and less tight of a sound you get. That's why getting an 8 string guitar with anything less than 28 inches is a bad idea, because it ruins the lower strings sound. Not to meantion, Ibanez is an incredible company that smokes a Washburn, Fender, Gibson, and Schecter guitar ANY DAY. Washburn -Cheap and lackluster. Fender - like a toy with outdated hardware, but classic and enjoyable if the right one is purchased. Gibson - Overpriced, Heavy weight with huge necks. Schecter - Guitars based on the look half of the time. stereotypical metal company that never quite hits the mark. As far as I'm concerned everybody can take their overpriced, lackluster, heavy, crappy guitars and make way for Ibanez guitars and PRS guitars. Because even though PRS has many pricey guitars, they are gorgeous and hit the mark with 25" scales and beautiful necks and bodies. Cheapest one is $500. Not too bad. Get a job and get one fools.
    Says an Ibanez fan. Well... Everybody has their opinion about brands and I'm not a fan of Ibanez. But yeah... There's lots of arguing here. But about guitars with only one pickup: Why not? Van Halen had one and I don't really use that much my neck pickup. And I don't have a tone knob on my Charvel because I don't need it. I think it kills your tone if it's not maxed. The number of pickups doesn't mean anything. Two pickups are enough, even one pickup is. It just increases the versatility of your guitar. But somebody doesn't need versatility or doesn't like the neck pickup sound.
    lordcowman
    Wow people scale length REALLY DOES affect the guitar in many ways. The shorter length you go, the slinkier it gets for bending strings and less tight of a sound you get. That's why getting an 8 string guitar with anything less than 28 inches is a bad idea, because it ruins the lower strings sound. Not to meantion, Ibanez is an incredible company that smokes a Washburn, Fender, Gibson, and Schecter guitar ANY DAY. Washburn -Cheap and lackluster. Fender - like a toy with outdated hardware, but classic and enjoyable if the right one is purchased. Gibson - Overpriced, Heavy weight with huge necks. Schecter - Guitars based on the look half of the time. stereotypical metal company that never quite hits the mark. As far as I'm concerned everybody can take their overpriced, lackluster, heavy, crappy guitars and make way for Ibanez guitars and PRS guitars. Because even though PRS has many pricey guitars, they are gorgeous and hit the mark with 25" scales and beautiful necks and bodies. Cheapest one is $500. Not too bad. Get a job and get one fools.
    mydian
    Great review. Looks like a nice axe. Too bad the comments are full of spam from that troll. I guess the mods don't ban people here any more.
    Olliecs
    Sorry but after seeing the comments i have to say this: A guitar no matter what scale length can have as many frets as you can fit on it, they could go all the way to the bridge if you used a piezo pickup if you'd like them to. This in no way changes the scale length. Anyway good review mate.
    bustapr
    i think people should start including in reviews, the feel of the guitar, like the weight balance and the feel of the neck. looks like a nice guitar for 320($438), but Ill never buy a guitar without a tone knob. woot, I didnt know US economy was that bad...
    Meneer
    Oh well that's enough trollin'. It's still a very nice guitar. And obviously the reviewer is happy with his purchase, so good for you!
    LoFiHiFi
    Cool guitar. I bet the covered, bridge humbucker sounds bad with some distortion. Personal I like the looks of the white one. But both look real clean. Washburn always makes good quality guitars (I have a Washburn semi-hollow body guitar, and a Washburn bass). rokkit don't let a jealous person ruin the purchase of your cool guitar.
    rokkit
    rv_phoenix wrote: Really, which Ibanez? Just wondering, since Ibanez uses on all metal axes the Fender scale... 24 frets, but 648 mm. (Let me tell you a tip: there is even a guitar with 25 frets!) And, dear rokkit, I never had a doubt you play metal: your manners speak very clearly that. But I'm not quite sure you actually play. A player doesn't think this way and, most of all, doesn't buy guitars online. I think you produce a sort of a noise some of your pals, by politeness, call "metal". (What do you mean by church music? In my country, the only music used in church is vocal. Here we talk about guitars. Or at least we pretend to, like some of the fellows - or it's just one? - above...)
    Who died and made you god of guitars? That would be NO ONE. Plus, my ibanez was a limited edition from 07 so they obviously arent going to keeps its specs. Please take the hint and go away
    rokkit
    Will you seriously all just **** off? I did a review for people like metal, and want to know about a metal guitar. And in my experience, slace length has never made ANY difference in sound and playability, so kindly, stfu.
    rv_phoenix
    saint_berzerker wrote: Yeah, this clown that is bitching about the review says you can't have a 24.75" scale w/ 24 frets? Ha! That just proves his lack of knowledge. Esp makes them...the vipers I believe. The idiot just pwned himself. Just go away, dude.
    Insulting people doesn't raise you IQ: it still remains below monkey's IQ. You're right about the Vipers, however, but only for the 6 strings model. The 7 strings has the Fender scale (just wonder why). It's the only example I've found of these awkward combination. (I was expecting you give me the example of the 27 frets ESP, but no, you're not that inexperienced, you're just stupid.) But it doesn't change the fact that, like I said, a company who respects itself, like Washburn, when replicating a classic design, doesn't "improve" it by adding strange features, only to please some monkeys. As for Ibanez, I've just checked with a friend of mine, who happens to be an endorser of Ibanez (yeah, after 30 year of playing, one might be acquinted with such people): no, Ibanez DOES NOT make 24 fret guitars on Gibson scale. Knowing spare data about instruments doesn't mean experience, dear monkeys.
    bustapr
    the scale only affects the distance between frets, and the number of frets affects the position of the neck humbucker. If you want to use this guitar for soloing, go get something else, this IS A RYTHM GUITAR.
    saint_berzerker
    Yeah, this clown that is bitching about the review says you can't have a 24.75" scale w/ 24 frets? Ha! That just proves his lack of knowledge. Esp makes them...the vipers I believe. The idiot just pwned himself. Just go away, dude.
    rokkit
    rv_phoenix wrote: Btw, this is an expensive guitar. It's a Signature Model, "GT" coming from "Greg Tribett". Rokkit bought it on a generous discount, but its catalogue price (check Washburn's site) is 1329 USD. Which is about the price of a Gibson Les Paul Standard, of a PRS Custom 24, and almost the double of a basic Fender Stratocaster. At this price, let me tell you the features are very scarce... You really pay for the fancy name, otherwise, the only thing you can do with the axe is bang your neighbours' ears... or play metal in a pro band (not ther case of our fellows above). This guitar doesn't even have a tone control, so its sound area is very very narrow.
    this is actually a really solid axe. its meant for people who play metal and metal only (like me)
    rhythmkillingMo
    @ rv_pheonix - I really liked this review, shame it got gangbanged by "someone" who cant take someones word for it.... Ive played this guitar and i think its an acurate rating, as its not rated against some USA made $6000 guitar, its rated on itself. Tone doesnt come from tone knobs, it comes from the pickup, the player, and the wood. Also remember, These are user ratings, meaning its their preference. If you would like a better review, do it yourself or pay for someone to do it.
    rokkit
    rv_phoenix wrote: Washburn is certainly a good guitar and a solid brand. But 10 for sound, for a guitar with only one pickup? After you granted only a 9 for (otherwise impressive) features, like something's missing up there? (And it really is: a second pickup!) How much would you rate a Music Man with 4 pickups and 21 combinations, then? A 38? And why do you think a 22 fret guitar is not enough? Are you such a great guitar player that you ran out of notes? Don't you know that Washburn is a serious brand, not a Chinese one, hence it doesn't alter an original design? Gibson's Flying V, which has generated a wave of emulation that includes your guitar, has only 22 frets. If you weren't so unexperienced in guitars, you could probably measure the guitar's scale: it's 628 mm, the original Gibson scale. On such a short scale, it's impossible to squeeze 24 frets. And nobody has ever seen a Flying V-type guitar with a Fender scale (that is 648 mm), the only one which can actually host 24 frets... I don't mention Staggs and other Chinese makeshifts that you tend to favor over serious brands. Believe me, dear fellow, you don't need 24 frets anyway. You can barely stammer something on 22!
    If you noticed, i never said i NEEDED 24. and when did i ever say i favored cheap brands? if youre going to troll, do it intelligently
    NathanRobbins
    phoenix isn't trolling and if you guys would listen to what he's saying the guy knows what he's talking about. how on earth can you justify giving a guitar with one EMG pickup that kind of rating. AND WITHOUT A TONE KNOB. that is as narrow as tone gets. even your EQ on the amp won't be able to shape the tone enough to get the versatility of adding another pickup. secondly, you claim that this thing is sooo much better than Ibanez but you never mention anything about this guitar's neck or which ibanez model you're comparing it to because i doubt it could hold up to others in the price range. so with a gibson scale (scale does make a difference in playability whether you think so or not), 22 frets (made according to the original V), a SINGLE EMG pickup, no tone controls, and a hardtail bridge you really want to sit here and claim that it's better than an ibanez with a comparable price tag. i know which one would win that battle my good sir. go have fun buying strap locks and flailing your guitar while playing in C standard tuning. i'll enjoy my dimarzio pickups with a five-way switch and edge tremolo while you're at it