Spider IV 30 review by Line 6

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  • Sound: 9
  • Overall Impression: 9
  • Reliability & Durability: 9
  • Features: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 8.8 Superb
  • Users' score: 5.5 (143 votes)
Line 6: Spider IV 30
0

Price paid: C$ 100

Purchased from: Long And McQuade

Sound — 9
currently I'm playing a early 2000 model Jackson RR3 and a 2003 Peavey Wolfgang through the amp, while my sensibilities tend to run on the harder edge, using each guitar through various setting can let you emulate a wide variety of tones. The amp rarely lets me down or prevents me from finding the setting I want, and while I'm not normally cranking it at 10, there's never a noise issue, unless I'm at practice and the terrible microphones are causing feedback again for me the key is to able to switch sounds and setting without having to do much tinkering, so I like the amp for that reason, being able to play pop, to rock, to metal, to country without really messing around is a great ability for style of playing.

Overall Impression — 9
Stylistically this Amp does everything I want it to do, I think the Spiders get a bad rap for all the uber-metal kids who crank on the insane channel and pull the look what I can do stuff, but the reality looks like this, if you take the time to learn about this amp and how to properly use its features, its a great toy to have. This isn't going to be the last amp I ever buy, its highly unlikely I'll play shows with this amp, but for messing around with some buddies or in your home this thing is hard to beat for being able to mix things up. It might not be the popular choice for "serious" guitar players, but what I play I could ask for a more agreeable amp at an agreeable price.

Reliability & Durability — 9
These things are tanks, I've dropped this thing more times than I care to count but it keeps on trucking, no issues with reliability. While the knock on them is that they may not be the greatest sounding amps, no one will accuse them of being poorly constructed or fragile. Being solid state means never having to worry about tubes, and the breaking and care that is implied with that.

Features — 8
Not sure when it was made, but its the newest model so sometime in the last 2 years I imagine, I'll be the first to put it out there, I like the Line 6 stuff, I like the versatility, as I'm primarily a guy who plays at home having an amp that deal with my general musical schizophrenia just by using the little pedal board my Fiancee bought me is pretty nice. I Jam with some guys from work, and the musical styling is all over the map so having something that can do cake, the cure, the darkness and tom petty without buying a mess of stomp boxes or costing me a couple of grand is a pretty sweet idea. It's a digital modelling amp, and that's more or less what what I use it for, if you take advantage of the tips that Line six has on their site in terms of messing with the channels and what not there's a lot of emulation you can make happen. I'm not saying it'll beat out a Marshall or Mesa or whatever amp suits you're playing style better, but if you like having some quick and dirty versatility this amp is excels in that area All that being said, there are definite issues with the presets, the cleans out of the box are too bright for pretty mch anyone to use, and the insane channel while great for the lauhs and masking of flaws it provides, is way too saturated on the distortion to reasonably use anywhere outside of your own bedroom

8 comments sorted by best / new / date

    GuitarViking
    Seriously, 80% of the people hating on this amp have only tried the Spider II's, which sucks compared to the Spider IV's. Get off your bandwagons.
    a7x4life666
    jesslindy wrote: I have the IV HD150 head and cab.
    And I want your amp. Anyways, all the Spider IVs are great with a huge range of tones. I currently have the IV 75, and I can get anything from my death metal to my NWOBHM.
    mysticguitar77
    I also have the Line 6 HD150 halfstack and it has the best sound of any non-tube amp I've ever played. Also, they're cheap, quality, reliable, versatile... I mean there's nothing bad I can say about Line 6. People hate on them because they think the tone is too processed/unnatural, but if you sit and tweak the settings enough, you can get a pretty good natural distortion tone out of it. Tube amps are the way to go (if you can afford them), but Line 6 is one of the best alternatives out there.
    Pat_s1t
    longneckdude wrote: I don't know how anyone could say these are reliable amps. My friend had one and the not on the input jack is cheap plastic that would always come loose. It eventually became stripped and would slip inside the amp every so often an I would have to unscrew the whole thing just to fish it out. Definitely not worth the money.
    I had the same problem with my Spider III 75w. I used to have to poke around with a slim wooden stick to try to get it back out through the input hole, then hold it with enough pressure to put a patch cable with the plastic nut on it inside so I could have stability when screwing it on. Before I sold it I lined the nut with superglue so it wouldn't come off again. The amp sounded like super ass too. Know matter how much I or my even more experienced guitar friends tried to get a good metal path, everything always sounded fizzy. That amp was the biggest waste of $300 I ever made.
    ciadude2
    I have heard people get good sounds with these at bedroom level, but seriously you're better off with a Vypyr. It's cheaper too. The amp tone sounds extremely flat and for a lack of a better word, more like noise than anything else. The Spider amps all in all are okay if you're a beginning guitarist. Just okay. If you want to get into guitar amp modeling get a Vypyr(Peavey), Cube(Roland), or Valvetronix(Vox). Hell, try software modeling like Amplitube, Revalver, Guitar Rig, or even Line 6's Podfarm. I use these when I play at night because my amp is a 6505+ head and those things are too loud for the night time. Cheers.
    VinnyChinny
    GuitarViking wrote: Seriously, 80% of the people hating on this amp have only tried the Spider II's, which sucks compared to the Spider IV's. Get off your bandwagons.
    Not at all...My friend has this exact amp and he hates it. I even hate it because the distortion sounds like trebly farting and if you ever tried to play lead on this it's even worse. Probably the only good thing about this is the speakers. The 120w version of this is n't bad though.
    mydian
    VinnyChinny wrote: GuitarViking wrote: Seriously, 80% of the people hating on this amp have only tried the Spider II's, which sucks compared to the Spider IV's. Get off your bandwagons. Not at all...My friend has this exact amp and he hates it. I even hate it because the distortion sounds like trebly farting and if you ever tried to play lead on this it's even worse. Probably the only good thing about this is the speakers. The 120w version of this is n't bad though.
    You and your friend don't know what your doing then.. if anything this amp has too much bass and can get muddy.
    rv_phoenix
    This is a very good amp for amateurs who don't make the difference between a real amp and something which only sounds LIKE an amp. In the same range of price, you can get other superb hybrid amps, with tube pre-amp and a sound 10 times better. Even the Kustom HV 65, despite being provided with the same stupid electronic DSPs - way off what an effect is and should be, in terms of sound -, sounds much better and has 35 extra Watts to deliver for someone who doesn't want to get ruined because of the equipment, but meanwhile intendss to come closer to the real pro sound. Line 6 should stop entirely: they're falsifying the entire concept of rock'n'roll with their cheap effects and stupid Variaxes. I haven't seen something more useless in my entire 30 years of playing.