Spider IV 30 review by Line 6

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  • Sound: 8
  • Overall Impression: 9
  • Reliability & Durability: 10
  • Features: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 8.8 Superb
  • Users' score: 5.5 (143 votes)
Line 6: Spider IV 30
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Price paid: C$ 249.99

Purchased from: Long & McQuade

Sound — 8
The guitar I use is a Fender Jaguar HH, equipped with Dragster pickups (produced by Seymour Duncan), this amp is useful for just about everything, from soft jazz to heavy metal, although I mostly play heavy metal. The amp is normally noisy when you only switch the amp models and/or channels without re-adjusting the tone controls, or if you are within a controlled, small area. If you are in an outer area, then the sound is similar to a 15-watt amp, which is small. Channels and amp models alone, you are limited up to 6 amp models, but with tone controls, there are many ways to customize the sounds. Myself, I maintain my controls as follows to protect the transistor: Drive (Gain): 75% Bass: 25% Mid: 50% Treble: 75% Channel Volume: 62.5% Reverb: 50% Clean channel is very slightly distorted at high volume/gain, but is not enough to affect the entire amp system. Also, the distortion is EXTREMELY brutal, EVEN WITH using single-coil pickups of a Fender Stratocaster I've tested back in the market.

Overall Impression — 9
I mostly play almost every single music genre imaginable, and this amp is a perfect do-it-all amp compared to other amplifiers I've seen in store. I've been playing with this amp for over 3-4 months now, starting from when I've popped my First Act amp while I played an Ibanez RG350MZ. Before getting this amp, I would've asked for a Roland Cube-30 amp or a Fender G-DEC amp, but this Line 6 amp had more top-notch features than those amps. If this amp was stolen or lost, I'd search the entire universe to find the amp back, even if it means of getting rid of anyone who stole my amplifier. I love this amp's top-notch do-it-all feature, but Line 6 should have more control over tone controls when switching amp models/channels. Comparing from other amps in market, Line 6 amps had better top-notch features. The only thing I'm wishing this amp had? On-board expression pedal and the tone control customization.

Reliability & Durability — 10
This amplifier is most reliable from all amps I've tested back in the market. I'd really love to use this amp in a gig without a backup, assuming that the transistor is still in good condition. This amp has never broken down on me, and it never will. Other than a few simple adjustments, I never had to do any extra hacks on this amp. This amplifier screams on you to rock on even more!

Features — 8
Line 6 Spider IV 30-watt amp, made in the late 21st century, is one of the most basic, yet versatile, do-it-all amp. It features up to 4 channels with 12 distortion models, 2 per effects; Clean, Twang, Blues, Crunch, Metal, and finally, Insane. Just like a normal 30-watt amp, it is more than enough to use in almost anywhere; a private dormitory, small gigs such as BOB, etc. This amp is a solid transistor amp, most able to withstand a lot of distortion abuse. I use almost every single features on this amp, due to the fact that I concentrate on almost every single music genres, from classic rock to modern heavy metal, this amp does just about anything. While others buy separate effect pedals, I'd buy this do-it-all amp. The features I wish it had were an on-board expression pedal, so that I could create controlled wah-wah effects, and the ability to easily toggle channels and distortion levels without having to re-adjust the tone controls.

3 comments sorted by best / new / date

    pratheekb96
    I've got a Spider IV 15 watt, It's a hell of a lot louder than my Lead Guitarist's Marshall 10 watt and has got a lot beastier and fuller tone...as long as you keep it on metal or insane. The 15watt has only Clean, Crunch (which serves well for punk/grunge, but really gives that nice, muddy tone for rhythm-blues playing), Metal and Insane. The riffs that I belt out have so much power and throw themselves around like a Firetruck....yet when I try to solo it always sounds thin and empty, absolutely no tonal capacity at all. No guitar, from an SX strat-a-be to Highlander/Schon Mix can keep any sort of solo going without making your ears bleed. If you're a rhythm guitarist who likes making the occasional pitch squeal or harmonic to spic up your riffs, this amp is perfect..., however if you're a soloist, I recommend you back away, as far as you can get. Rhythm gets an 8.5, Lead about a 4-5. Ive used it plenty of times in gigs and had ir for over a year so I've tried everything to get it to solo, but its as stubborn an ***** as I am and won't help me solo in the least. :\
    i coudnt have said it better!! dat was jus perfect!!
    pratheekb96
    dis amp is frikin brilliant for beginners and semipros n pro cud use it as a bakup aswell.
    Krayzie-Bone
    Its the Kyle wrote: I've got a Spider IV 15 watt, It's a hell of a lot louder than my Lead Guitarist's Marshall 10 watt and has got a lot beastier and fuller tone...as long as you keep it on metal or insane. The 15watt has only Clean, Crunch (which serves well for punk/grunge, but really gives that nice, muddy tone for rhythm-blues playing), Metal and Insane. The riffs that I belt out have so much power and throw themselves around like a Firetruck....yet when I try to solo it always sounds thin and empty, absolutely no tonal capacity at all. No guitar, from an SX strat-a-be to Highlander/Schon Mix can keep any sort of solo going without making your ears bleed. If you're a rhythm guitarist who likes making the occasional pitch squeal or harmonic to spic up your riffs, this amp is perfect..., however if you're a soloist, I recommend you back away, as far as you can get. Rhythm gets an 8.5, Lead about a 4-5. Ive used it plenty of times in gigs and had ir for over a year so I've tried everything to get it to solo, but its as stubborn an ***** as I am and won't help me solo in the least. :\
    but why would you use a a 15w amp for a gig?