MA50C review by Marshall

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  • Sound: 7
  • Overall Impression: 8
  • Reliability & Durability: 8
  • Features: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 7.8 Good
  • Users' score: 7.4 (55 votes)
Marshall: MA50C
0

Price paid: C$ 600

Purchased from: Long and Mcquade

Sound — 7
I have a variety of guitars, Axis, Ibanez Prestige, Fender Strat, Gretsch etc... I play most genres of music rock, blues, metal, rockabilly etc... The clean channel is great, crank it up and it only starts to break up around 8. The gain channel I didn't like and new I wouldn't because of teh reviews. I bought this amp knowing I'd replace the preamp tubes with JJ12ax7S tubes - all three. What difference, fuller sounding, the grit was gone. that's all this amp needs.

Overall Impression — 8
For the money I can't complain, I knew this wasn't a $2000 JCM stack. I also have another tube amp 60watt 2x12 and it was triple the price and does sound better - what do you expect? I plan to use this for practice and small venues. Its light, sounds great and has the Marshall sound (Once you add the 12ax7s).

Reliability & Durability — 8
I've had mine for two weeks but don't have any concerns. The amp finish looks fine. The controls feel fine. Mine was a floor model so when I brought it home I simply wiped it down with a towel and warm water. Looks solid and sturdy, handles are solid and placed well. I gig every few weeks so time will tell.

Features — 8
The amp has two channels plus an overdrive with separate EQ for each. Also has presence controls and spring reverb. There are three 12ax7 and 2 el34 tubes. Teh foot controller has gain and OD switches. Simple layout and easy to use and view while playing - standing up.

6 comments sorted by best / new / date

    rv_phoenix
    guy_tebache wrote: Wow that top review is tough. I'd tend to agree though. Theres no need for an entry-level valve amp. Entry level manufacture cuts costs and if you cut costs on valve amps they sound just as shit as SS ones.
    You took the words out of my mouth. Just as Peavey's ValveKing, Marshall's MA Series is a nonsense, since it's too expensive for a beginner and too lousy for a pro. Worst of all is the fact that it rarely operates as a full Class A amp. Most of the time it's a Class A/B amp, with a SS rectifier that explains most of what the third review, submitted by unregistered on 19th Sept, has said so sharply. Marshall has increasingly become a comercial make. And it also doesn't sound the same anymore, after relocating the assembling work to India. If you want that Marshall sound of the '70s, you better buy a Blackstar.
    LeakyFlask
    rv_phoenix wrote: Most of the time it's a Class A/B amp, with a SS rectifier that explains most of what the third review, submitted by unregistered on 19th Sept, has said so sharply.
    I don't really think the problem lies in the rectifier being solid state, for example, most Fender amps have SS rectifiers. The problem, I guess, is simply that is is poorly made.
    rv_phoenix
    I missed a coma in my post (that's because I prefer to spend on my musical equipment, instead of my computer, my wife keeps on telling me). The culprit is not the rectifier, indeed, but the fact that most of the time it operates as a Class A/B amp, not as a Class A one. I know most Fenders have SS rectifiers: before buying my Vox Night Train, I stared for about three months in front of a Hot Rod Deluxe and a Blues Reissue. I might even buy the Blues Reissue in the future, despite my satisfacion with Vox's cleans. But Fender are - and have always been - reputed for their cleans, aren't they?
    LeakyFlask
    rv_phoenix wrote: I missed a coma in my post (that's because I prefer to spend on my musical equipment, instead of my computer, my wife keeps on telling me). The culprit is not the rectifier, indeed, but the fact that most of the time it operates as a Class A/B amp, not as a Class A one. I know most Fenders have SS rectifiers: before buying my Vox Night Train, I stared for about three months in front of a Hot Rod Deluxe and a Blues Reissue. I might even buy the Blues Reissue in the future, despite my satisfacion with Vox's cleans. But Fender are - and have always been - reputed for their cleans, aren't they?
    Ah, of course, I simply misinterpreted your writing. Hm, strange, I recognize your name but you've only made 1 forum post!!
    Slap-happy
    Irishman94 wrote: Linkerman wrote: EpiExplorer wrote: Why use a Squier strat.. an Epi Les Paul would be only a little bit more cash and sound many times better. Especially through tube.. It's a matter of preference. If you want a bright, single-coil sound, a Squier Strat is a far better option than an Epi LP (with its bassy, muddy humbuckers). I got the best of both worlds! An Epi Les Paul with an Alder body!!! FTW it rawks
    . Meh - that's hardly the best of both worlds... i have a Standard Tele, a Tele I built myself, a swamp ash bodied SG and a black beauty Cutom Les Paul - that's covering most of my bases (although something with P90s is next on the list.... As for this amp? Truly horrible sound. I have played through a multitude of Marshall's over the years from vintage Plexi's through to the Slash Limited Edition head and this sounded weak, wimpy and thin, regardless of the guitar I was using. The Class 5 is probablt the best product Marshall have released in the last five + years. If you are looking at getting a 50w tube head then shop around and look at used alternatives - there are comparibly priced Laney, Orange and Fender amps out there that, although used have plenty of life left in them and will sound leaps and bounds better than this thing.
    mkittell
    I absolutely love this amp. Those of you who are knocking it are likely trying to get more out of this amp than it was meant to deliver. For the price of this amp it is really a gem and it is capable of putting out some stellar all-tube tones.