DA5 review by Vox

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  • Sound: 8
  • Overall Impression: 8
  • Reliability & Durability: 7
  • Features: 8
  • Reviewer's score: 7.8 Good
  • Users' score: 6.9 (86 votes)
Vox: DA5
0

Price paid: £ 70

Purchased from: Local music shop

Sound — 8
Using the equally versatile and great value Yahama Pacifica 15V, it suits all my need, from impressive clean sounds to blues and heavy overdrives. There are eleven different "styles" to select, while the effects to compliment them are as follows: auto-wah, chorus + delay, chorus + reverb, compressor, compressor + chorus, compressor + phaser, delay, flanger + reverb, reverb, rotary + reverb, and tremolo + reverb. Some obviously sound more impressive than others, but you can't really complain about the overall package. If you want an "Appetite for Destruction" era Slash tone, even just to mess around with "Sweet Child O' Mine", try this out: Style: HIGAIN1 Gain: 11 o'clock Tone: 1 o'clock Master: preferably as loud as possible! Effects: reverb EDIT1: 1 o'clock

Overall Impression — 8
Playing a variety of music, but mainly classic to modern rock, this suits me very well for home use and practicing. I'm not a hugely serious musician - it's just a hobby for me - and am glad I got the DA5. I initially looked at the Vox 15R Pathfinder, but the built-in effects and price swayed me. When buying the DA5, the only real difference between it and more expensive amps I looked (aside from price) was the power and size. The basic tones aren't too different to what I was getting from amps almost two or three times as much. My only regret is the design. The shop didn't have the Vox Classic design, only the less aesthetically pleasing black with a chrome grill. Looks obviously aren't too important, but they go some way into your overall impression of an amp. Other than that, I can't pick too many flaws in the DA5. Well done Vox!

Reliability & Durability — 7
It hasn't broken down for me yet, and doesn't look like it's about to either! I wouldn't particularly recommend it for gigging with, but only because of its size and power. If you're out busking or jamming, though, the DA5 is a very reliable and impressive amp.

Features — 8
There are plenty of affordable practice amplifiers on the market, but with eleven built-in effects and styles, Vox's DA5 may well be the most impressive and versatile. It certainly backs a punch for what it is, with an unbelievable range of sounds, and a "tap" button helps you refine your tone by setting the delay time or modulation speed. The DA5 can be powered by its AC adapter or by six C batteries; there is a built-in output power switch (5W, 1.5W and 0.5W) to help extend battery life by play at lower volumes. You can connect external audio devices such as CDs or an MP3 player, while the combination line/headphone output can link up to headphones, mixers or recorders.

3 comments sorted by best / new / date

    jetwash69
    rv_phoenix wrote: It might be one of the best small digital amps on the market, it is certainly a Vox, but digital modelling amps are the most atrocious novelty in the guitar world in the last 20 years. It falsifies the very concept of Rock, which is finding your own sound. And, anyway, none of the sounds it emulates is exactly the same as the original, so does it worth trying? Giving up a real all-tube amp and switching to one of these monsters is like cutting a healthy leg and putting a titan-made prosthesis instead... Also, none of these amps can be used for gigging or professional records.
    You're missing the point of this amp. BTW, it's discontinued now. It's the only solid state amp I could really recommend for practice/bedroom/busking. Beats the pants off any MG, Spider, or Cube. It's even more versatile than the Mustangs, Vypyrs, Oranges and VOX VTs in it's class. Hook it up to a halfway decent MFX and you can tweak any solid state tone out of it you want so you can find your own sound . But no, it doesn't replace a good tube amp if you have the luxury of using the tube amp like it was designed to be used.
    rv_phoenix
    My friend, I'm an old Vox customer. I practice, for about 10 years now, on a Pathfinder 15 (IMHO, a better choice than the DA 5) and I gig on a Night Train cum cabinet. I've already stated my belief that, within the narrow concept of a digital modelling amp, this might be one of the best , if not the best. So I guess I've actually caught the point. But if you really want to get serious about music (and you need a small amp to suit your bedroom), why not choosing the AC4TV? It's not so expensive, it's small and it looks awesome, you might even find a place for it beside your furniture, so your wife doesn't get mad about 'another music device in your house' (like mine does) etc. etc. Let's not encourage the big names on this path, of digital modelling. Otherwise, it will be very difficult, over 20 years, to find a good all-tube at a reasonable price. They will become a luxury item, completely out of reach of common guys like us.
    rv_phoenix
    It might be one of the best small digital amps on the market, it is certainly a Vox, but digital modelling amps are the most atrocious novelty in the guitar world in the last 20 years. It falsifies the very concept of Rock, which is finding your own sound . And, anyway, none of the sounds it emulates is exactly the same as the original, so does it worth trying? Giving up a real all-tube amp and switching to one of these monsters is like cutting a healthy leg and putting a titan-made prosthesis instead... Also, none of these amps can be used for gigging or professional records.